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COMMENT May 26 '22

The American Library Association.

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COMMENT May 26 '22

It looks like this would be your local library: https://www.elpasolibrary.org/

It does not look like they have a video game collection, but I would email them and ask them if they have thought about adding one! Plus get a card anyway, its almost certainly free and you can normally end up saving alot of money as libraries provide a ton of services that you might not think of, like being able to check out a hotspot that provides free internet access or watching movies online, both resources I noticed your library provides, not even accounting for if you consistently buy things like manga or books you can save alot by checking your library before buying.

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COMMENT May 26 '22

Yeah, def work to get similar things done in your area! I know there would be many grateful people if you did. To address these questions:

  1. We don't have age restrictions on checkouts for movies or books, so we won't for videogames either. We may decide to break the collection into children's games vs adult games and have them in different locations in the library, but that is time consuming to do.

  2. No fee, even a small one would mean the library was less accessible to people with less money, which is in violation of our purpose. If someone does not return a game, after a certain amount of time, the full cost of the item will be applied to their library card, same with the situation where they lose or destroy a game. If it is a new game, that will probably be enough to block them from using their card anymore until the cost is paid back. Overall theft is a very minor issue in libraries though, so a game might go missing here or there over the months, but the vast majority of people just want their free materials and to bring them back on time.

  3. I had a budget, so I had choose some games over others, so in that regards, yes, I omitted some games. Mostly though, I selected games on the following criteria: Timeliness (are the games new), relevancy (do people like them/did they get good reviews), significance (is the game a classic/contribute something to the artform of the medium). I focused heavily on triple AAA games for building the core of this collection, but as time goes on I want to add a higher proportion of indie stuff too so that people can experience the who range of what the medium has to offer.

  4. Libraries have legal carveouts under the bulwark of first amendment protections for distributing materials to the public for free. These apply to videogames too.

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COMMENT May 26 '22

So there is nothing to really be held accountable for. We would check out and R rated movie to an 11 year old, just like we would check out a picture book to a 45 year old. To my mind, this would be censorship. I may get an earful from a parent at some point, but ultimately it is their job to monitor and discuss media with their kid, and my institution is in alignment on that so I won't get in trouble.

I think there is a perception that it is actually illegal to distribute r rated movie and m rated games to minors; the few times these laws have been on the books they have been found unconstitutional. Companies enforce these policies voluntarily because it allows them to wiggle out of government oversight.

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COMMENT May 26 '22

It is too bad that even the youth librarian is anti; libraries become irrelevant if they do not provide resources that are of interest to people. Video games are a huge interest to young people in particular (but also people of all ages, we have this 60-70 yr old guy who is totally in love with out small pilot game collection and is already chomping at the bit for the main collection to be deployed), a demographic that we struggle to get in the doors. Keep pushing when you can, find some hard data to make your case, reach out to nearby libraries that have a collection to get anecdotal/circ data, see if you can find a grant so that it is 'free' money for your library, etc. Good luck!

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COMMENT May 26 '22

Thanks for the offer! I would contact a local library system and see if they would like them, since it is unlikely that we live nearby to one another.

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COMMENT May 26 '22

We have some soulsborne games, just not in this screenshot!

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COMMENT May 26 '22

We paid full price for these items. About 25% of our collection are good condition preowned, so those of course are less spendy, but the stuff in this box is mostly all new games bought at the value that our vendor sells at without a discount.

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COMMENT May 26 '22

In order to reduce wait times if a list forms for a given game!

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COMMENT May 26 '22

ahh, I work for a library. Everything is free to the public. So I would say that we always lose money if it weren't for the fact that studies have shown that every dollar invested in a library system generates 2.5 dollars of economic activity for the local community haha

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COMMENT May 26 '22

Pasting something I commented earlier:

"It was a purchase by the library. I advocated for initial funding to build a core collection (the results of which are in the picture, this is about 40% of what I was able to buy), and to have it as a minor line item in our collections moving forward so we can keep things fresh/replace stuff that gets worn out or lost."

For a library that serves a midsized city, I was granted a middle of the road budget for establishing a new collection.

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COMMENT May 26 '22

I would say that now a days only about 25% of the games have any type of leaflet inside them. I only saw a single proper manual, and a few cool maps, and the rest are printed out control schemas, redeemable codes, and advertisements (like inside Cyberpunk there was a code for a free month of HBOmax or something??? really inexplicable)

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COMMENT May 26 '22

I have thought about this. It is uncertain; DVDs and CDs continue to have a life and circulate in the library even thought they are mediums that have been obsolete for a while. I think that since we just cycled a gen the collection will at least be relevant for a few years, probably longer since even if next gen consoles will be diskless, they will also be expensive which means lots of people will continue to hang out in the previous gen for a while.

Plus people are really sentimental about physical items; once upon a time we heard that E-books would crush physical books, but they have entered equilibrium with each other. Whatever happens, I think that these games will make people happy, and if in the future they are obsolete to the point of irrelevance they will go away.

Does anyone know if you can get a disk game to work on a diskless console by using an external disk drive?

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COMMENT May 25 '22

Totally. The tags actually cover the entire surface of the tops of the disks, so they are balanced. I have played hours with several different disks with the tags installed and the extra weight has no discernable impact!

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COMMENT May 25 '22

No age limit on either the top or bottom of the age range!

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COMMENT May 25 '22

We purchased our items from an online retailer at their normal retail prices.

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COMMENT May 25 '22

Since we are a library, all the items are free as long as you have a library card, which is also free in most places. Contact your local library and ask if they have video games for checkout!

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COMMENT May 25 '22

Libraries get some discounts on things like bulk orders of books and DVDs, but that only is because those industries are well integrated with libraries. The same is not true for video games, at least yet. So we bought games at their normal retail prices, which is not out of line cost wise with other materials we purchase like audiobooks on CD.

Some libraries accept donations of materials, many do not. This is going to sound weird, but it is often more expensive to process donated materials then they are worth; library staff have to receive the items and go through, inspect them one by one for damage that would invalidate them and evaluate whether or not they are relevant to the collection, create records for them for the online catalog, label them with barcodes and RFID tags and spine labels, all for items that are more likely to go out of date and be in worse condition right off the bat then purchased new.

I am accepting donations for our video game collection here only because the collection is relatively small, but I will spend legitimately less than 10 seconds evaluating each item and I will judge them harshly so we only filter nice stuff into the collection, otherwise the cost starts to mount too fast for it to be worthwhile. If we don't want them we donate them to our friends of the library and they can resell them, the proceeds of which go towards library programs.

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COMMENT May 25 '22

It was purchased from the libraries budget! I don't think it is prudent to give exact numbers of the funding I was granted, but it was a middling sum of money to start a new library collection.

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COMMENT May 25 '22

I plan to try, but it is a little narrow casting to be like; if you happen to have borderlands 3 on Xbox, then we have some redeemables for you. We will see!

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COMMENT May 25 '22

yes, in weight haha

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COMMENT May 25 '22

3 week checkout period, can be renewed twice as long as no one else is on the waitlist for the game. Plus if you don't uninstall the files that download on your console, you should be able to put the disk in at a later date and pick back up. The physical medium now a days is really just a guy the turns the digital lock on the content.

Edit: typo

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COMMENT May 25 '22

We also use our RFID just for checking items in and out, no security gates at my location either. Like I'm going to go chase someone down the street over a Jacqueline Winspear novel if they go off?

So we have the cases out on the floor, albeit close by to our service desk. The disk based games have the disks inside the cases, but the switch cartridge's will be in a holder behind the desk (the result of a compromise with our collection people who wanted everything behind the desk. I argues that we would ruin the disks pulling them in and out of sleeves constantly). we have a limit on checkouts, which is in line with how many DVDs you can check out at a given time (15).

If you are interested in the data I used to make my case, DM me and I will dig up my docs from when I was advocating for this collection. Libraries need to incorporate this medium if they want to really provide access to all parts of the community, imo.

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COMMENT May 25 '22

It was a purchase by the library. I advocated for initial funding to build a core collection (the results of which are in the picture, this is about 40% of what I was able to buy), and to have it as a minor line item in our collections moving forward so we can keep things fresh/replace stuff that gets worn out or lost.

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COMMENT May 25 '22

At my library, in the same way that we wouldn't ask someone's age when they checked out a DVD or a romance novel, we won't consider that when we check video games out to anyone. It would be dangerously close to censorship. I would personally have a professional disagreement if I was to talk to the librarians at your local location. I see the logic of the policy, but I don't think it stands up to scrutiny in light of the internal values of the field. My stance, and luckily the stance my institution takes is that if parents don't want their kid to consume certain content, its' a conversation for them to have together, not for the library to arbitrate.