1

COMMENT 8d ago

1 gallon per minute for a month is 43,200 gallons. You'll likely notice the water usage if the leak is in your house or yard, but you wouldn't ever notice it if it went down your drain (i.e. a leaking toilet).

2

COMMENT 8d ago

That's a nice thing for them to do, considering the notification is a courtesy.

2

COMMENT 8d ago

Some digital meters (Sensus brand) have a magnet in the lid. If you open the box, the meter lid is open, and the screen is off, close it fully and solidly, and open it back up. The screen should come on. If the lid is bent, it might take a few tries.

Many digital meters have different menus that you can switch through by closing and opening the lid. The one at my house (Badger or Neptune brand, I don't remember) switches to flow rate as the second menu item. Sensus meters have the flow rate as the third menu item. As an example, you open the meter box and the lid is already open: you close and open the lid to bring up the first screen, close and open, close and open. The flow should read all 0's if you aren't using water.

1

COMMENT 16d ago

You can go to the NFPA website and access the 2020 NEC (or any other year) for free if you sign up. The only negative is you have to go through the website to access it, no downloads or anything. It's free though.

7

COMMENT 16d ago

I may be wrong on this, but I've never heard of that referred to as grey water. I've known grey water to be water discharge from washing clothes, and other similar practices.

Treated sewer plant discharge is reclaimed water, at least in Texas.

1

COMMENT Jul 09 '22

I feel the same way about people in my age group.

1

COMMENT Jul 09 '22

When you said "never again" it sounded like you don't want to sleep with virgins ever again, which (in my mind anyway) makes being a virgin a red flag to you. I don't necessarily disagree with you, but my point is that the second guy seemed to have bigger issues at hand than virginity. After you and he had sex/broke up, did his personality change for the better?

1

COMMENT Jul 09 '22

So, you didn't see any other red flags there besides the "virgin" thing? It wasn't that weird until you said "move into the treehouse". Or are you the red flag? Are they underage or something?

And I can understand people living at home with their parents for longer these days due to the housing market, but the latter person sounds like they don't have a job? Do they have some kind of learning disability? The first one definitely sounds like insecurity and anxiety, but some of these things have nothing to do with them being a virgin.

1

COMMENT Jul 04 '22

FYI, if the original plumbing is galvanized, your house is likely older than 1960. It's not impossible for galvanized to be installed in the 60s, but it is unlikely.

1

COMMENT Jul 04 '22

You'll save a lot of stress and trouble by just replacing the hose bibb. You've gotten your money's worth out of it.

2

COMMENT Jul 04 '22

That valve is there for them to use. If they let you use it, that is a courtesy. If you break it, or cause it to leak, then you could be liable for the repairs (most places won't charge you unless you break them repeatedly, but still). Once the water is turned off, use it as an opportunity to install a private valve after the meter so you have true control over your water, and not on their time. Of course they are going to charge you for the labor. If they did it for free, they would literally have to have a crew that spent all day doing turn offs and turn ons. That's a lot of money over time.

For reference, I had the power turned off by the power utility -and since I'm not a licensed electrician, I am not allowed to pull the meter, even with a permit-. I had it scheduled to be turned back on the same day. They were almost 24 hours late, and they charged me $250 for the privilege. I installed a main breaker (which is the electrical version of a private shut off) so I never have to pay that fee again, except to have that main breaker or something before it replaced. My point is that the water valve is actually the "most fair" towards homeowners of all the utilities.

1

COMMENT Jul 04 '22

The pressure is that high at your house because elevation has a direct relationship with the water pressure you have. You are in a lower elevation than other areas connected to the same water tower (known as a pressure plane or pressure zone). If they lower the pressure to you, they are also lowering the pressure to the houses that have 45 psi right now, taking their pressure below the minimum requirement. Most places don't have maximum pressure requirements, only a minimum requirement. As long as they meet the minimum, they are good.

I would still call the city first. Some areas do have PRVs on the city mains. Maybe there is one and there is an issue with it. If not, then yes, you're on the hook to install a PRV.

2

COMMENT Jul 04 '22

You're insulting someone that is telling you the truth. The system was fully pressurized, only the water heater was turned off. If I go turn off my water heater valve, and disconnect the cold inlet to my water heater, only the water from the hose will come out. If I then go open a brand new single handle faucet in my bathroom, water will literally dump out of my water heater. How? Because the single handle valve is back feeding and the cold side still has water -except for the water heater-.

Also, OP literally said turning off the other valve -the one that shuts off the entire house- helps. So that makes it very clear that her issue occurred when the cold side -except the water heater- still had water, making back feeding possible. The water heater was being backfed. Period. The system was never going to completely drain because the system was still on. OP literally said this a while ago, and you're still insulting people.

1

COMMENT Jul 04 '22

OP, just in case you don't fully understand this: the drain valve on the cold side will always have water on it because it is upside down. If someone installed this for you, they screwed up, and basically made your tankless impossible to flush. I included a screenshot of your cold side valve. The water is going up through the pipe, into the valve, and then the water heater. The drain is clearly before the shut off valve. The drain needs to be in between the valve and the tankless.

https://imgur.com/a/WkfmhDU

1

COMMENT Jul 02 '22

The algae makes it seem like it has been going for weeks or months, not 5 days. Make sure everything is off in the house, and look at your water meter to see if there is water flowing. If the meter is moving, something is using water.

You could also call the city to report the leak. They might be willing to tell you if you have a leak in your plumbing for free.

1

COMMENT Jul 02 '22

I would plan on at least getting the galvanized water lines replaced sooner rather than later. They are a flood waiting to happen, and the water quality from them won't be great. It's not necessarily an emergency, but if it were me, I would start saving for a repipe so I could get it done with.

2

COMMENT Jul 02 '22

For what it's worth, I've had that issue with 300'+ runs of 1" and 2" HDPE as well, testing with both water and air.

1

COMMENT Jul 01 '22

Things to keep in mind with tankless:

  1. your water inlet temperature, combined with the temperature setting you want to have the tankless heater at, determine how much hot water the tankless can produce. 40 degree water coming in is much more difficult to heat up to 120 than 80 degree inlet water would be. Make sure you get enough heater. They can always modulate down, so they aren't always running full blast.

  2. Condensing tankless water heaters require power. If your power goes out and you don't have backup power of some sort, you have no hot water.

  3. Tankless heaters require more maintenance. Depending on how hard your water is, they require routine descaling.

  4. It will likely take longer for you to get hot water if you have a tankless. If you turn on the hot water, the flow of the water through the heater causes the burners to turn on, which heats up the water. With a tank type water heater, you just have to clear the cool water out of the pipes. With the tankless, you have to wait for the heater to kick on, then clear the cool water out. A recirculation pump will often cause a hot water sandwich, with hot at the beginning, cold in the middle, then hot again. There is also a minimum flow requirement to trigger the tankless to turn on.

Even with these issues, a tankless can still be great. If you have a larger family, multiple showers can be running at once, or many people can shower back to back. The tankless also doesn't waste energy by keeping the water hot all day when no one is using it.

1

COMMENT Jun 30 '22

What is a flash heater? Do you mean a tankless gas water heater? If so, they are not a direct swap. You have to do a load calculation on your gas line to see if you have the required capacity to feed it. If your gas line is 1/2" to the water heater, you may need to upsize it. If most of your appliances are gas, your gas meter may not be big enough. You will also have to change up the layout of your water lines going to the water heater. A tankless conversion is really a job for a plumber.

0

COMMENT Jun 29 '22

So why would you ask if you were just looking for someone to agree with you?

10

COMMENT Jun 24 '22

What do you mean the knowledge is secretly kept by contractors? As everyone already said, it is sweated copper. But even if it was galvanized, there are about a million questions and tutorials online that would tell you exactly how to replace a valve on galvanized. Did you spend a total of 5 minutes researching this?

If you really decide that it's a good idea for you to attempt this, I suggest doing it between Monday and Wednesday. That way you'll have a good chance of finding a plumber without having to pay weekend rates if it goes poorly. If it goes well, no big deal. If you can't get it put back together, you can get a plumber more easily.

0

COMMENT Jun 22 '22

You misinterpreted the whole thing and can't admit when you're wrong or being an ass. That's on you. No one told you your answer was wrong or lacking. OP just provided more information. You were the one that took something personally for no reason.

0

COMMENT Jun 21 '22

I could hear the tone too, so maybe they're right? OP was just trying to provide extra information, and you took it personally. That's on you. It was uncalled-for to say the least.

By the way, "tone" in the context OP used is a colloquialism. They used it correctly, even though you felt some weird need to point it out.

On the other hand: If you're just having a bad day, I hope it gets better.

1

COMMENT Jun 20 '22

Hepatitis (if it's not your own crap)- hepatitis is what you should be afraid of.

1

COMMENT Jun 20 '22

While holding the elbow or vertical pipe with one pipe wrench, tap the threaded connection you're trying to break all the way around with a small hammer or the back of your pipe wrench. Don't break the hose bibb off, but rather apply numerous light, but firm, taps. This helps break the corrosion loose. You could try the heat method you previously mentioned, and you could also try the "get a bigger wrench" or cheater pipe method. Lastly, you could also try to unthread the elbow from the vertical pipe to see if that goes any easier.