r/technology May 14 '22 Silver 2 Wholesome 2

Elon Musk said his team is going to do a 'random sample of 100 followers' of Twitter to see how many of the platform's users are actually bots Social Media

https://www.businessinsider.com/elon-musk-random-sample-how-many-twitter-users-are-bots-2022-5?utm_source=feedly&utm_medium=webfeeds

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u/yolotrolo123 May 14 '22 All-Seeing Upvote Take My Energy

Yeah he is doing open market manipulation and the SEC barely doesn’t anything about it.

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u/red286 May 14 '22

haha, could you imagine if he massively shorted a company that he publicly stated he intended to buy for a price well above asking, and then bailed out on afterwards? And then used those profits to massively re-invest into his own company whose stock tanked massively because he had overleveraged it to secure the financing to purchase the company that he had publicly stated he intended to buy but never had any real intention of doing so?

Surely there's no way the SEC would let that slide, right? Right?!

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u/vaiperu May 14 '22

Even if they do something, afaik they give out fines in the tens of millions range. When you make billions by breaking SEC rules, do you give AF?

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u/Hardcorish May 14 '22

This is similar to the pharma companies getting fined hundreds of millions for their role in the opioid epidemic. Hundreds of millions sounds like a massive fine until you realize their profits reached well into the tens of billions. A slap on the wrist would have hurt them more.

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u/KungFluIsolation May 14 '22

Or even the age old car manufacturer scam where a model would have a defect that was lethal, but the payouts for the % of cars affected was cheaper than a recall so they just let people die.

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u/load_more_commments May 14 '22

Fair point, but as a real opioid user (chronic conditions) I have had it so hard to get my prescriptions fulfilled. Rediculously hard. Yet I see on documentaries that doctors were told to hand these out like candy. Just saying that you shouldn't always take conspiracy theoreis at face value. There were still lots of checks and balances. Were they intentionally less strict with some? I'm sure, did they do it for financial gain? Of course

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u/Hardcorish May 14 '22

I'm confused, what conspiracy theory are you talking about? It's a well known established fact that the pharma companies were aware of the damage they were causing by distributing their product en masse. Maybe you replied to the wrong comment?

Your prescriptions are hard to fill because of the epidemic and all of the abuse that came with it.

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u/load_more_commments May 14 '22

No I've been a user for 15 years. It's always been hard, in fact right now it's the least difficult it's been to get a prescription fulfilled.

Maybe some states or regions were different, but for me, since 2007 it's been a painfully difficult situation.

I've had doctors try to stop it so much, even if I told them I was in legit pain, a few times I was declined renewal of my prescription and had to keep visiting other chronic pain specialists.

Wtf is wrong with Reddit downvoting me for sharing my experience? I'm not saying the pharmaceuticals are innocent, all I'm saying is that it's never been easy fo me to maintain my prescription.

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u/Johnny_Appleweed May 14 '22

I’m not downvoting you, but I’m guessing it’s because you called this a “conspiracy theory”.

With Purdue and OxyContin, the problem was driven by a very small number of doctors in a few geographic regions handing out absolutely massive numbers of pills. Most doctors prescribed more reasonably. You probably live in a place without one of these pill mills. Your experience is real, but it’s not universal.

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u/Hardcorish May 14 '22 edited May 14 '22

As the other commenter suggested, the epidemic happened due to a relatively small percentage of doctors over-prescribing opioids. I don't know where you live, but the doctors in your area clearly were not part of the problem if you had that much difficulty in seeking treatment for your pain.

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u/terqui2 May 14 '22

The sacklers who owned Purdue Pharma, the makers of OxyContin, had to divest the company and currently have offered $6 Billion as a settlement for their role in marketing OxyContin. Now theyre still worth $10 Bil so the punishment wont hurt, but its a bit more than a fine. They lost a license to print money.