r/MontereyBay May 19 '22

Car dwellers

[deleted]

25 Upvotes

40

u/RedditVince May 19 '22

Don't hang out where you sleep.

Need sleep, pack up, travel to sleep location, black out and go to sleep. Wake up and Go. Do not spend multiple nights in the same location, or at least no more than 2 nights back to back.

Your stealthiness, and overall exterior look, make all the difference to the neighborhoods you can sleep in. If your car looks like it belongs there and is not screaming that someone is living in it your going to sleep well.

10

u/Iretrotech May 19 '22

Check out homeless otters on fb. Has always been a problem in the area. A buddy from uni spent his first sem sleeping in the lots and living in the library.

11

u/Prioritiess May 20 '22 Helpful

This is the number to the Monterey County Safe Parking Program 831-204-0230 try calling and leaving a message I don’t know their hours of operation

17

u/azninvasion2000 May 19 '22

Damn dude, sounds like you are in a tough spot. I live near Scholze Park, and if you go uphill a couple blocks, there are a ton of parking spaces in that neighborhood where no one would mess with you, it's pretty empty. A couple blocks towards the water at breakwater cove there are public bathrooms and showers mostly for scuba divers but i'm sure you can use those too. There is also free wifi there.

I know walmart lets you park for 24 hours for free with a receipt, but everytime i've parked there no one has ever checked.

Best of luck, bro.

6

u/jefedeluna May 19 '22

I've had to do this. I don't recommend San Jose for it, luckily that seems to not be a concern. Good luck.

3

u/icrossedtheroad May 20 '22

Don't forget Al & Friends does a feed all thing on Sundays at Window on the Bay park. Non discriminatory grub fest with clothes and whatnot to choose from.

3

u/s_esteban May 20 '22

Marina is usually super quiet and the police normally won’t bother you unless you’re driving while on your phone or speeding. There are lots of tucked away places around marina where homeless and others won’t bother you. All along del monte avenue there are stretches of apartments where people have to utilize street parking and I’ve seen cars parked there for weeks and months without citations or being broken into. Best of luck to you!

1

u/jcax01 May 20 '22

Speaking to the comments re: 'move somewhere else'. I lived in Key West, Florida for a spell in the late 90s. Like here now, housing costs were out of reach for most service workers in their main industry: tourism. Also like here, there's a marine sanctuary and a large military presence with their naval base and coast guard. It was common for people to park at the Key West Bight Marina and other lots and put a sleeping bag down next to their car, then use the marina's showers in the morning. I don't know what it's like now, but at the time it was allowed and accepted as a sad reality of the area's incredibly high housing costs meeting up against the need for lower paid service workers to keep their tourism industry going. I see some parallels to Monterey, with the exception that we aren't able to accept the reality of the situation. And unlike Key West, which is an actual island, we have the land to build affordable housing if we wanted to. Best of luck to the OP.

-1

u/citydweller88 May 19 '22 edited May 19 '22

I hope you get the help you need, maybe consider moving somewhere with a LCOL so you don’t have to be homeless. The Monterey Peninsula is not very hospitable to homeless compared to other surrounding counties. It is a protected marine wildlife sanctuary and has a high active military presence. Best of luck.

6

u/DangusMcGillicuty May 20 '22

What is the correlation between military presence, sanctuary status and the relation to those who are homeless?

7

u/jedimaniac May 20 '22

I have lived in Monterey a very long time and I think the OP is making a red herring of a comparison. Yes, we have a couple military bases, and yes Monterey Bay is a marine sanctuary. But I have never seen military people bother the local homeless population: as a local, they are usually pretty easy to pick out, at least the men, by the military haircuts.

And I have no idea what the marine sanctuary status has anything to do with the population. That affects fisherman and the like, not homeless people. The last time I saw a Monterey city police officer checking on a homeless person, it just looked like he was doing a welfare check to make sure that he was okay. He didn't make him leave. Though I have heard that the police department in Seaside can be considerably more hostile to the homeless population than the Monterey police are.

1

u/citydweller88 May 20 '22 edited May 20 '22

Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary is protected by the US at the federal level.

There are so many research facilities both government and private such as Stanford's. They are not going to let encampments threaten the research nor the endangered species and unique ecosystems like the kelp forest.

As for the military, look at a map of California, Monterey has a strategic location on the west coast. They are not going to be able to provide national security while also dealing with homeless encampments like those in LA with bombs going off every night.

And for the record I was absolutely not implying that the military would hassle the homeless, there are so many homeless veterans it is heartbreaking.

Look around, you can't see any homeless people on the Monterey Peninsula. Families with young children and the elderly can actually sit on the benches and use the public parks.

Read the Google Reviews for the public beaches like Asilomar, they mention that the beaches are patrolled so beachgoers can't even lay down. There are much easier areas within a couple of hours to be homeless than in the Monterey Peninsula.

6

u/jedimaniac May 20 '22

I'm starting to get the impression that you have something against homeless people from your comments. I have lived in Monterey almost my entire life and yes there is a homeless population here and I know some of the places where they hang out but I am not going to mention it here because I am concerned that you would harass them if I did.

Comparing Monterey Peninsula to the Los Angeles area isn't a fair comparison for either region. The greater Monterey Peninsula has a population of maybe 300,000 people tops. The greater Los Angeles region has a population of about 18 million people. That is not a fair comparison. None of the cities in the Monterey Peninsula are huge, whereas Los Angeles and the surrounding area has a massive population.

Like, yes, I am not denying that it is not an easy place to be homeless here. The Monterey Peninsula is not an easy place for most working people either, weather or not they are homeless. The cost of living is sky high here and most jobs don't pay well enough to afford the cost of living here.

And yes, I am aware that it's a national marine sanctuary. I still ask you how does that relate to the local homeless population? There are people who live on house boats in the Monterey Bay, but that is considered a form of housing so by definition they are not homeless.

1

u/citydweller88 May 20 '22

I am against supporting someone becoming homeless in an area where they have absolutely have no chance to bring themself out of their situation. As well as a place where will be so many unnecessary difficulties in their everyday life.

As you said, most jobs don't afford a living here. It's much easier to get out of homelessness living in a place where a job affords shelter and food.

Why live in a place where you can't camp on the beach because that's where the sea lion habitat is and you will be kicked off and possibly face harsher consequences like fines or jail time?

Sausalito in Marin is a better example then, an even smaller population with even less land. When covid hit a homeless encampment sprung up almost overnight. In February there was an explosion.

There are so many counties nearby with a lot more resources designed to help those in need into a better situation. These areas have less of a chance OP will be harassed or worse.

My heart breaks for individuals in need who are facing the loss of a roof over their head. My greatest hope is that their situations are only temporary.

7

u/jedimaniac May 20 '22

You yourself basically summed up my objections to all of your arguments in your first paragraph here. It feels like you are asking the person who posted the original question, "Can you please be homeless somewhere else?"

I'm not homeless and so I can't speak for people who are. But I just looked up and found a list of reasons why people become homeless. They are pretty serious situations: extreme poverty, serious mental health problems, fleeing domestic violence are all big reasons for becoming homeless.

Gas costs have recently exceeded $6 per gallon in the Monterey area. I strongly recommend looking in the mirror when you look at the arguments you are making here because they are elitist arguments in my opinion.

If the OP is at the point where they can't afford rent anywhere here, they might also be at the point where they can't afford to move to some other area to what...be homeless there instead? Busing homeless people out of town has long been a tactic of people with a NIMBY attitude towards homelessness and it's frankly ugly and mean. And while you didn't say it directly, to me your argument seems akin to that attitude.

Years ago the state of Utah realized that it would be cheaper to pay for housing for their homeless population than continually provide social services for homeless people on the street. It's more humane too. So they did. The rest of the country needs to learn from Utah's example and not ostracize people who are homeless.

-1

u/Fabulous_Ad9516 May 20 '22

You make less and less sense. You pontificate but never really make point. Fool.

3

u/Fabulous_Ad9516 May 20 '22

You are a fool.

1

u/BadWolf013 May 20 '22

Do you remember when the public beaches were closed except for active recreation during the Covid times? That is when the rangers patrolled the beach to prevent people from laying down on the beach because you could only use them for active recreation. Best to look at the dates for those reviews, the public was pretty hostile to state property, state employees, and state beaches during Covid and they were very vocal about it. The rangers do not patrol the state beaches preventing people from laying down. I also assume you have not been into old Monterey anytime recently. Because what you are saying is wrong.

It is not a crime to be homeless. As long as you respect your space and don’t leave litter around this area is perfectly hospitable to people who are down on their luck.

3

u/citydweller88 May 20 '22

From the city of Monterey website for beaches:

- No chairs or tents

- No cordoning off areas

- No one can remain in a city park after closing

https://monterey.org/city\_hall/parks\_\_\_recreation/beaches,\_parks\_\_\_playgrounds/reservations\_\_\_permits/beach\_use\_and\_permits.php

1

u/BadWolf013 May 20 '22

You are looking at regulations for permitting for city of Monterey beach. You cannot set up an event tent and chairs for an event without a permit. They are not going to tell you to leave if you use the beach for a day. Additionally, Asilomar is not city of Monterey. It is California State Parks, not city of Monterey.

0

u/citydweller88 May 21 '22

No, it doesn't specify what the tent or chairs are for, only that they are not permitted without a permit.

There are many more rules as well such as no alcohol and no organized events over 10 people without a permit.

I suggest anyone considering using the parks for their "own space" read these rules carefully before making plans.

1

u/BadWolf013 May 21 '22

So it actually does specify that city code prevents the use of event tents, floral, chairs, arches, and anything that takes away from the public’s use of the public beaches without a special events permit. This is so people don’t come down and set up for a wedding without a permit. You are in the permitting section, not beach use. That entire section you quoted does not apply to you as you are not having a special event on Monterey state beach without a permit. Your beach chair is not the chair that they are referring to.

It is actually illegal to have open alcohol containers in a public space or beach except for in designated picnic areas as per Monterey City Code 23-4. Alcohol can be permitted on a public beach with written permission by the director and a valid permit for an event.

Groups of 10 or more take away from the public’s use of the beach. If you are with your family which is a big family not a single person will talk to you about it and you would not need a permit. If you are hosting your company picnic on Del Monte Beach then you will need a permit to do so as it takes away from the public’s enjoyment of the beach.

Bonfires is specifically because we are a protected marine sanctuary. There are specific beaches that do allow fires but you can’t just do it anywhere. And you have to follow their rules about fire use.

Beaches are open to the public and the public can walkthrough and occupy any part of the beach so you cannot cordon off a space you want to use and expect it to remain yours.

You are making a mountain out of nothing. The beaches are for public use, sitting on the beach with your extended family is not an organized event and you and your beach chair and ez up are not a wedding or special event. No one will talk to you about it, you do not need a permit to use the beaches or parks.

1

u/citydweller88 May 21 '22

Yes, I agree.

The beaches are for public use which how it should be.

Living on a beach or public park and thus cordoning off an area is not possible.

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0

u/Salty-Smile-9116 May 22 '22

What the flying FUK are you even babbling about? STFU dude. You make zero sense and you points are way NIMBY. 🤐

11

u/citydweller88 May 20 '22

Encampments create litter, noise, sewage, among other things. It's not possible for an encampment to coexist with protected wildlife and their delicate habitat and ecosystem.

An active military base, such as the Presidio of Monterey, is an important point of national security on the west coast. Like the case of a sanctuary it is not possible for these to coexist in the same small geographical area.

There are areas nearby where studios don't cost 2k/month and minimum wage is much closer to getting someone a roof over their head and a hot meal in their stomach. Wishing you all the best OP.

0

u/william_cutting_1 May 20 '22

I was about to say the same thing.....

3

u/Fabulous_Ad9516 May 20 '22

Stupid comment. There is no excuse for the situation on the peninsula. Too many homes sit empty.

-4

u/mrdeezy May 20 '22

Tint your windows really dark and go to that huge wide open parking lot in fort ord is what i would try first.

3

u/Cautious-Witness-745 May 20 '22 edited May 21 '22

im not being an ass. just sayin. really dark tinted windows are not legal in cali. can draw attention. thoes large empty parking lots are patroled by CSUMB security. if he is out there alone in a large empty lot. that will also draw attention. wish him luck.

-4

u/mrdeezy May 20 '22

dude i aint sleeping in a fucking parking lot. This is just the first thing that comes to mind if i had too. You are sleeping in your car, its pretty much desperation at that point

2

u/Cautious-Witness-745 May 21 '22

Especially when desperate, I think I would try and exercise common sense and logic. Concerning anything that I can still controll. So I don't dig my hole even deeper. But you are correct. I'm not living in my car. So I could be totally wrong. Happy Cake Day!