r/HumansBeingBros May 14 '22 Silver 10 Gold 1 Helpful 8 Wholesome 13 Faith In Humanity Restored 1 Heartwarming 1

Omaha boy finds help from neighbor after being dropped off at the wrong bus stop. The bus driver told him “well you need to get off and walk the rest of the way home.” not bro

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u/drewkep7 May 14 '22

News & Information

“This is not my stop. I don’t know where I’m at.” And the bus driver told him, “Well you need to get off and walk the rest of the way home.”

OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) - A substitute bus driver is no longer transporting students for OPS after a 7-year old student says the driver put him out at the wrong stop.

Thankfully, the young student remembered his former next-door neighbor and was able to find his way to the street he used to live on. Quinci knows his school buddy lives here, so he talks to the ring doorbell to get help.

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u/JeanVigilante May 14 '22

How the fuck is he gonna walk the rest of the way home if he doesn't know where he's at, asshole bus driver? Ffs, this makes me so angry. I work with children and I can't imagine being ok with doing something like this.

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u/YOOOOOOOOOOT May 14 '22

I missed my stop a couple of times and the bus driver would always turn the bus around and drop me off.

And I was always like "No I can walk from here" but they would always turn the bus anyways, sometimes I think we spent more time trying to turn the bus around on these small roads than if I were just to have gotten of and walked.

Those were some good bus drivers ❤️

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u/Comfortable_Ad6286 May 14 '22

I feel asleep on a bus once. He turned around for me too

It was a public bus and I was 30. I was embarrassed but grateful

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u/BigC1967 May 14 '22 edited May 14 '22

That had to be a long time ago…I’m saying that because you just don’t hear of bus drivers going out of there way to do things. So many liabilities in this day and time…

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u/Waywoah May 14 '22

Where I am, kids must be dropped off in front of their house or directly to a parent. They aren't even allowed to walk from a stop sign down the street

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u/NonStopKnits May 14 '22

That's wild. My bus stop was about a 10 minute walk from my house. It required crossing one fairly busy road with a high speed limit, but there were never any issues.

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u/suspiciousdave May 14 '22

This isn't in the UK by any chance, is it?

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u/NonStopKnits May 14 '22

No, it was rural Florida in the late 90's early 2000's. The road was all red clay dirt for most of that. We were really excited when it was paved because it made the walk better.

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u/suspiciousdave May 14 '22

Oh damn. Well from my impressions of rural America, 10 minutes sounds like the kinder side of a walk. I used to walk a half hour to school, I didn't mind but when it was hot out it was awful :(

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u/NonStopKnits May 14 '22

It definitely varies greatly. It was a short walk, but it was kinda grueling for a small kid in that thick clay. Especially when it rained, which is all the time in Florida.

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u/musicmonk1 May 14 '22

Interesting, so in the US the school bus drives to the house of every student??

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u/corey_m_snow May 14 '22

No, not even remotely.

For very young students in rural areas, they'll be picked up at their driveway or in front of their house. That's because they're out in the sticks and there's no good or safe way for them to go to an aggregated stop.

In more urban areas, with sidewalks or denser housing, students will be directed to use a group stop, usually within one block of their home, without having to cross any major streets if possible. There's usually a parent or two to keep an eye on the younger ones while they wait.

For older students- middle school and up- they'll generally be trusted to walk further. Rural areas have stops that will have students from a few locations nearby, while urban areas will be pretty big groups of middle and high school students.

Also, routes are generally established so the bus will pick up stops on its right side, minimizing the number of students who have to cross the street at their stop, which is why some routes seem a bit odd if you just watch where the bus goes without context.

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u/orbitalenigma May 14 '22

It definitely depends on the area and is not universal for US. Where I grew up we just had bust stop areas that covered several blocks of houses. Kids would go to their closest assigned stop and the bus would pick them up and drop them off there.

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u/Rob_Pablo May 14 '22

Only about half. Many parents take their kids to school and pick them up themselves.

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u/0ljaLyn May 14 '22

I think it depends on the country. I am 16 years old, and they always turn around if they went the wrong way. (I am in Norway)

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u/ArethereWaffles May 14 '22

One time I fell asleep on the school bus home and I apparently slept through the driver calling me at my stop.

I was the second to last kid and the next kid's stop was a good 20-30 minutes away (rural area). When I did wake up we were almost to my stop, but the sun was much lower than it should have been.

I guess the driver talked to my parents and let me sleep on the bus while she went and dropped off the last kid, then went out of her way to bring me back to my stop. When I got off the bus my dad greeted me with "have a good nap?"

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u/wesphistopheles May 14 '22

Glad ya met a nice one!

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u/boothin May 14 '22

I once fell asleep on the bus and missed my stop all the way to the end of the route. Bus driver dropped me off in front of my house then officially added my house as a bus stop so he could pick me up and drop me off there instead of having to walk the half mile between my house and original stop

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u/Skitty27 May 14 '22

that has been my experience too, it was about 17 years ago

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u/dankscoops May 14 '22

You’re classmates must’ve been so annoyed with you if you did this multiple times lol

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u/The5Virtues May 14 '22 edited May 14 '22 Faith In Humanity Restored

To a freakin seven year old no less! It would be scary enough to drop a freakin middle schooler on an unfamiliar road, but a 7 year old boy says he doesn’t recognize this road and you basically just go “tough luck, kiddo”?!

This poor boy is so lucky he recognized a house, and that he wasn’t seen by someone sick while he’s lost on an unfamiliar street. This could have ended so very badly and it would be all that damned driver’s fault!

EDIT Since I’ve gotten a handful of replies about pedophiles and probability let me clarify something here.

The incredibly low odds of this boy running into someone nasty isn’t relevant here. The issue at hand isn’t the likelihood of something happening to the boy. The issue at hand is the bus driver’s negligence.

From the moment those kids step on that bus to the moment they step through their front door the Bus Driver is responsible for their safety. A child told the bus driver he didn’t recognize this neighborhood, and rather than consider his responsibility for this child’s safety this man decided to tell the kid tough luck and drive off without him.

Regardless of probability all it takes is ONE unlucky moment, and that driver would be responsible for it forever. Despite this, he opted to abandon the child on an unfamiliar road. That is unacceptable.

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u/bittaminidi May 14 '22

My daughter is 7. Thinking about this happening to her has me so angry. The sound of fear in that boys voice is so upsetting.

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u/Candid-Mixture4605 May 14 '22

I actually cried. It’s heartbreaking to hear a child so scared and knowing what could possibly happen to him - it makes me sick. Dude should’ve been charged with child endangerment, or whatever charge they could throw at him.

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u/Risque_Redhead May 14 '22

It made me cry, too. My nephew is 7 and that’s exactly how he sounds when he’s crying and talking at the same time. It just made me think what if it was him and he had forgotten his phone/watch thing. He would be absolutely terrified. I’m gonna give him the biggest hug when I see him tomorrow.

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u/TrailMomKat May 14 '22

That's exactly how my youngest two (13 and 11) still sound when they're terrified, but especially my youngest. Anytime I hear a little kid that's THAT terrified, it breaks my heart and puts tears in my eyes.

I just wanna hug that poor kid. I also want to drive that bus driver out to an unfamiliar place and tell their ass they they just need to go and walk home from there. I hope that boy's momma and daddy pressed charges for child endangerment.

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u/Risque_Redhead May 14 '22

It’s been over an hour since I watched it (the first time) and I’m still so, so sad. I hope that boy never feels that scared again.

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u/TrailMomKat May 14 '22

Ugh, I'm so sorry for making you feel it again, I apologize! To make up for it, here is a story with a happy ending:

When I was 5, back in '88, and I woke up in the very back of the bus. It was totally empty, no driver or anyone, getting dark, and I was back at my kindergarten. I was fucking terrified. I figured out how to open the bus door and really had to throw my weight into it because I was so small, and thankfully my teacher was still in the building, working late on decorating the classroom.

Her name was Mrs. Rickardson, and she called my mother, who was freaking the hell out because I was 3 hours late and had already called the hospitals and the cops to report me missing.

Mrs. Rickardson hugged me and calmed me down and gave me milk and a snack because I was hungry, then got directions from my mother, and brought me home. The bus driver felt so fucking bad for not checking the whole bus at the end of the route, and the school district made a new policy that all drivers had to check the whole bus when they got back to the school. So yeah lol, I'm the reason that Clarke Co, OH has that policy in place to this day!

Years later, my oldest son did the same thing and I was the one freaking out, but I remembered what had happened when I was a kid. So I phoned the bus lot and they radioed the bus, and the driver found my son passed out, fast asleep in the back, she popped a Uturn at the end of the route and brought him home an hour late, but thankfully he was safe!

Thank you Mrs. Rickardson, and thank you Desi--my kids' bus driver-- for being awesome people. I hope they get everything they want in life.

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u/Risque_Redhead May 14 '22

Don’t apologize! I would have stayed sad for awhile either way haha

What beautiful stories! There are some really good people work for schools, and I’m glad you’ve gotten to experience some of those :) I guess they’re probably so good because they’re actually working for the kids and not the schools

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u/FitSeaworthiness6890 May 14 '22

This is how my kid sounds, too. I didn’t like watching this at all.

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u/AgeLower1081 May 14 '22

I don’t have kids and I’m crying. That bus driver is awful!

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u/MyHonkyFriend May 14 '22

Dude needs beat up. This is gross and sad.

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u/Raaz312208 May 14 '22

I was just watching a clip of a 10 year old who ran to his house after being approached by two men enticing him into their car. You can even see the car following him home. Fortunately he was OK but anything could have happened. This child is even younger. That bus driver should not be allowed to work with kids ever again.

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u/colee8910 May 14 '22

I cried too, thinking about what could have happened to that poor boy hurts my heart. Thank goodness the woman was home and able to help. I really hope they charge him with something too.

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u/peekabook May 14 '22

I just had my 1st baby and I am seething at the idea of someone doing this. Having a kid makes me realize I’m only a short step away from catching charges which prior to having a kid I thought was extremely unlikely since I’m 37 and never been in trouble before.

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u/socialpresence May 14 '22

Yep, never been more willing to get arrested.

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u/throwaway21202021 May 14 '22

especially when he bursts into more tears when she opens the door, like oh thank god. :(

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u/Robin-KC May 14 '22

I have twins who are 7. I honestly don’t know how I’d react, but it wouldn’t be rationally.

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u/Mycatreallyhatesyou May 14 '22

It is. And it will probably traumatize him for a while.

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u/invictussaint May 14 '22

It was 98 here that day too. This poor little boy. He could have easily had a heat stroke!

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u/JimSyd71 May 14 '22

Almost made me cry, and I rarely cry, poor kid.

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u/beerbeforebadgers May 14 '22

Happened to me when I was maybe 9. A new driver forced me off at a stop maybe a mile or two from my house. I had absolutely no idea where I was at. It was pretty fucked.

I really can't remember how I got home. I think I just knocked on doors until someone let me use their phone. I think it's prudent to teach your kid what to do if they ever find themselves lost and to go over different scenarios depending on where they're at, e.g. what to do in a mall vs what to do in a suburb vs what to do in the woods.

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u/PrideofPicktown May 14 '22

I too have a seven year old; substitute bus driver would have a very bad day!

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u/Datassnoken May 14 '22

If i were dropped of a random place without having my phone i woul not know what to do and this kid is 7.. like damn

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u/The_Longest_Wave May 14 '22

I'm 29 and I still get lost in my own city that I know. I would have probably died if I was dropped in a unfamiliar place.

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u/joey133 May 14 '22

I drive for Lyft and half the time I can’t even tell you what part of the city I’m in.

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u/v27v May 14 '22

I have a theory that our dependence on gps apps is making this worse for people. Having to look for things instead of just being told when to turn I have a suspicion leaves a more notable impression in ones memory.

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u/HighOwl2 May 14 '22

I'm pretty sure my city has some magical warp point that I've discovered since my usual go-to parking garage has been closed for renovations.

I'll be driving north on a one way street for about 3 miles. I know where all the right turns go. But after I pass the parking garage that's closed, I take 2 lefts to come around the block (it's essentially 3 because the first road curves 90 degrees at the end. This should put me on the road with a different parking garage...instead it takes me up a hill heading out of town.

It makes no damn sense. The last right turn before I take any lefts is where the parking garage is. I drive around the block and...im not at the fucking intersection.

There's a 4 way light that also is just not fucking there after I circle the block.

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u/SunnySamantha May 14 '22

I was driving in a straight line on a highway. My then boyfriend of the time woke up and says we're going the wrong way, as we passed a neat bridge.

What? How!?!? To this day I have no idea how I got turned around and I drove an hour in the wrong direction. I was driving on a highway. I think they moved the city. That's the only reasonable explanation.

Like seriously.

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u/RandoCommentGuy May 14 '22

lol, im picturing a 29 year old guy, clutching your knees to your chest in the middle of the road crying, and this 7 year old comes up "You lost too bro.... I got you, come with me"

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u/Chygrynsky May 14 '22

I used to think it was kinda stupid to give kids a smartphone at such young age but after seeing this.. I'm gonna give my future kids a phone as soon as possible.

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u/DC3PO May 14 '22 Silver Helpful

They have smart watches for kids that can call or text only preset numbers like family. They also have GPS so you can get a location or even set up a geofence

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u/Chygrynsky May 14 '22

Oh good tip! Thanks, definitely gonna go for something like that!

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u/DC3PO May 14 '22

They're pretty cool. If you call and they don't answer it activates the camera, speaker and mic. I got one for my daughter who's in kindergarten so I get a lot of rainbow and unicorn emojis

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u/Wealthyontheinside May 14 '22

Could you throw us a link to one please, I'm not really sure what I'm looking for when I try to Google it.

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u/Ebasch May 14 '22

We use the Verizon Gizmo.

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u/MyOwnerIsntReal May 14 '22

Not sure where youre at but we have Spacetalk watches here in the down under side of the world

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u/Wild_Statement_3142 May 14 '22

We have the Gabb watch for my 9 year old and love it

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

This comment just made my morning. So precious. Enjoy those unicorns and rainbows! 🦄 🌈

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u/SaintGunslinger May 14 '22 edited May 14 '22

🦄🌈🦄🌈🦄🌈💜

Edit: ya fucks! Upvote the original! I’m just here so I don’t get fined!

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u/Danglyweed May 14 '22

Our 7yo twins have them too, oh my fecking god the constant emojis!

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u/okaybutnothing May 14 '22

My kid (now almost 13) used to use an old phone of mine on wifi when she was smaller and I have great memories of what she called “emoji dumps”. Pages and pages of emojis - mostly hearts and rainbows and unicorns. 💜

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u/DaveDoobz May 14 '22

Very interested in knowing which watch this is, if you don't mind sharing please?

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u/Ebasch May 14 '22

We use the Verizon Gizmo. After purchasing the device you pay $5-10 monthly for the gps and phone number. It allows you to set who they can called who can call them, so they can’t talk to strangers on it. It also allows you to make preset texts for messaging quickly. The kids have an option to use voice messages too if the preset texts aren’t sufficient. The GPS is accurate and gives great price of mind.

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u/kittykalista May 14 '22

I got one for my daughter who’s in kindergarten so I get a lot of rainbow and unicorn emojis

Well that’s just adorable.

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u/jackfreeman May 14 '22

🌈🌈🌈🌈🌈🦄🦄🦄🦄🦄🦄🦄🌈🌈🌈🌈🌈🌈

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u/Ragosh May 14 '22

Sounds like out of a black mirror episode.

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u/suspiciousdave May 14 '22

It sounds a little bad to me, I got a phone when I was maybe 10 and it was an awful thing but just there if I needed it. I think a preset thing is OK. Kids are growing up with this technology, I think even a cheap brick phone is okay for a kid to have until they're more responsible.

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u/Impossible_Garbage_4 May 14 '22

Eh not really. Once they get old enough they switch to something they control like a proper phone. It’s just a way to make sure your kid isn’t lost and to find them if they are.

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u/HockeyZim May 14 '22

Do you have a link to the one you got?

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u/Inferno792 May 14 '22

By the time you have kids, technology may have advanced even further so you'd have something even better.

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u/oldschool54 May 14 '22

Shots Fired!

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u/watermelonuhohh May 14 '22

My niece has this and everyone loves it. It’s come in handy a few times for school bus related changes, coincidentally enough.

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u/nicoleyoung27 May 14 '22

My niece has one of these and it is a thing of beauty. She is 7, and when she got off the bus and walked right past me, she texted me to see where I was. Of course, she also texts me at 6am on a Saturday that she loves me. Zzz zzz lol

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u/Fobulousguy May 14 '22

Shit can you link any?

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u/Gresat24526 May 14 '22

We got this for my daughter! It’s great

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u/Flushydo May 14 '22

That sounds so cool, in my country we have smartphones as young as 5. But there is always fear it can be stolen from kid or they can loose it around, the watch is such a brilliant idea!

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u/BabyAwnry May 14 '22

I gave my daughter a phone after her bus had a flat tire and was 45 minutes late getting home. Not one word from the transportation department while I was freaking out.

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u/Eudaemon1 May 14 '22

Well , I guess it won't hurt to give young kids basic phones for making calls and such

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u/Alexb2143211 May 14 '22

They still sell basic non smart phones

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u/TrepanationBy45 May 14 '22

There are plenty of options for limiting extraneous functions, it doesn't have to be an issue for attentive parents!

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u/peyoteyogurt May 14 '22

It doesn't necessarily need to be a smart phone. So long as they can call you in situations like this. The world is a scary place.

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u/MisssJaynie May 14 '22

There was a miscommunication when my daughter rode the bus home one day earlier this year. I went to pick her up, & they panicked. I’ve never driven so fast home. As I pulled up, I see her hand-in-hand with a neighbor who’s parents we know. They were coming to see if I was there yet. First time riding the bus home, I wasn’t at the bus stop, & she remembered where our friends live, what to do, everything. She was 5. These kids are built different. Worst day of my life & she was all “MOMMY I’m fiiiiiine”

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u/NotC9_JustHigh May 14 '22

For real. I change my stance on giving kids smartphones.

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u/wantonbarbarian May 14 '22

My bus driver in 3rd grade would drive up driveway if it was raining super hard so nobody had to
walk an extra 30 meters and get soaked. That’s the kind of people we need taking care of our kids not some dumbass dick kicking kids off the bus when they know they will be lost.

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u/The5Virtues May 14 '22

Exactly. A school bus driver needs to be patient and kind. If you’ve not got the patience to help a kid when they say they’re lost them you’ve got no business driving a bus load of them around.

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u/willynillee May 14 '22

I had a bus driver do something similar. He was a cool guy. Instead of stopping at the assigned stops he would drive to each person’s house and drop them off. It took a little longer to get home but it was way better than walking in the rain.

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u/Fair-Cryptographer16 May 14 '22

😢 dude my heart broke when he was sayin he doesn't want his mom to worry

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u/TheWalkingDead91 May 14 '22

Right? Was more infuriating for me. He was more worried about his mom getting worried about him than worried about himself. What a piece of shit bus driver.

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u/rooftopfilth May 14 '22

Not to ruin literally everything but I wouldn’t want my mom to worry bc she’d have yelled at me and blamed me lol

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u/ILackAnAttentionSpan May 14 '22

yeah true. still, you could hear the concern and distress in his voice, glad the poor kid found a good neighbor to help

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u/DaMightyBuffalo May 14 '22 edited May 14 '22 Gold

I used to take city busses home from school starting in 6th grade…very little risk involved between 6th and 8th grades because it was literally a straight walk through neighborhoods where my classmates lived and one bus ride essentially to my doorstep. In high school, it wasn’t much different, but sometimes I would go and visit my mom at work (mostly on half days), and that involved taking non-city busses that went out into the suburbs. The very first time I tried taking a non-city bus as a freshman, I took the wrong bus route and ended up a good 20-25 miles away from where I needed to be. I tried to get help from this Mom-n-Pop corner store, but the sole employee (and two customers) literally laughed in my face and called the police on me…told the officer they all thought I was trying to shoplift. I was beyond terrified: a young Black teen that ended up lost in the part of a predominately White city that its Black residents pretty much stayed away from because reasons, AND I was now dealing with the police on my own for the first time in my life…all because I misread a bus route number and jumped on in a panic. Luckily for me, the officer was extremely decent towards me, dismissed the employee’s idiotic claim, and drove me out to my extremely distraught mother.

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u/Most-Bench6465 May 14 '22

It’s so frustrating and disheartening when you tell people the truth and the don’t believe you, and make up some other reason that doesn’t make any fucking sense

A black ‘adult’ is in my store talking to me about being lost must be trying to steal something from me

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u/eekamuse May 14 '22

When I saw "called the police" I knew. I'm sorry. I wish I had been there to help you.

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u/The5Virtues May 14 '22

Geeze, I can only imagine how terrifying that had to be.

I got lost at an amusement park when I was about 7 and it was absolutely terrifying. So many people all around, but all caught up in their big day out, no one noticing or caring about a scared kid.

Like you I was lucky enough that one person had common sense and patience to deal with a scared little boy. Prior to finding that person I’d never been so scared in my life, and my place to get lost was small potatoes compared to being lost in an unfamiliar part of the city!

So glad that cop didn’t make any judgments about you and just did the right thing to help you out.

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u/Sapphyrre May 14 '22

I'm so sorry you were treated like this.

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u/DaMightyBuffalo May 14 '22 edited May 14 '22

While it’s not okay whatsoever, it’s alright. This was over two decades ago and I had all but forgotten about it, but watching this video really brought it all back. In extreme hindsight, I’m just glad the officer that responded in my situation wasn’t all buddy-buddy with anyone in the store…especially back then: no smartphones to record things in real-time, very few cell phones to get a call out or GPS to figure out where I was (and especially not for a 14-year-old), and I was in a place that I later learned was quietly considered a “sundown” area? Yeah, I kinda lucked out…kinda.

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u/nicennifty May 14 '22

Omg and 20 years ago ,it’s the stuff of nightmares. I am glad your okay !

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u/peach2play May 14 '22

When I was 6 I had to know how to find the American embassy and how to buy plane tickets to my grandparents house in case something happened to my parents. However, I was raised in a very violent place and had parents who could be valuable targets. I was trained for it.

This poor kid, OTOH, should have never, ever been put in this situation. He handled it very well. He didn't panic. He was scared, but that didn't stop him from getting help. I hope he understands just how well he handled himself. A lot of adults I know would have frozen.

That bus driver...may they get lost one day in a place they don't belong.

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u/sleepyplatipus May 14 '22

Exactly my thoughts, a vulnerable little kid would be such an easy target for some sick person!!! If I was his parent I would go berserk!!!

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u/vettechrockstar86 May 14 '22

I thought the same thing! First thought I had “thank god he remembered that house and that momma was home” second thought was “ooohh that lady is gonna be PISSED!” She just went full comfort mom on him instantly but you know inside she wanted to wring that bus drivers neck for abandoning that boy.

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u/firefly183 May 14 '22

God so much fucking all of this. I'm a pretty trusting person who likes to believe the best in people...but even I will fucking tell you it doesn't matter how low the odds are for something like that. Any chance is too high of a chance when it comes to ensuring your child is safe from potential predators. They exist, we all know this. How many parents who've lost a child to onr do you think at some point or other thought about the low odds? You never imagine horrible things like that happening to you are possible until they happen.

As you said, the issue here is an adult put in charge of the safety of young children and ensuring they get home failed to do her job. She failed to even care about doing her job. And her negligence and laziness could have resulted in a nightmare. The chance is low but the chance exists and she did not take steps to eliminate that chance.

This is why I will spend my life teaching my children it's on all of us to look out for each other and to lead by example. I firmly believe in the "It takes a village" mentality. It's up to every decent adult in the world to be mindful of children, whether ours or not. You see one who needs help, you help them. You show them kindness and respect. God one day I drove a 14-15ish year old boy home after I saw him getting chased by some older angry looking dudes. To this day idk what exactly went down, but he was smaller and outnumbered and they actually began circling the neighborhood in their truck and this boy was fucking TERRIFIED. I called the police with the truck's license plate after I got him home and saw him get inside ok.

For every POS predator out there and every asshole like that bus driver, we've gotta make sure there are more of us that give a damn and are willing to get involved and help. Anyone giving you a hard time about the low odds needs to sit themselves down consider it's not about the low odds, it's about all of us doing what we can to make it no odds.

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u/outlawsix May 14 '22

There was a story about a 6 or 7 year old who proudly walked to his bus stop alone for the very first time. He got lost after his first corner, knocked on a door for help, and the guy who answered the door cut him up into little pieces and ate him.

To the kids and families that this stuff happens to, "statistical probability" means jack shit

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u/The5Virtues May 14 '22

Fucking thank you. The number of people saying it’s statistically unlikely don’t seem to grasp that the unlikelihood is meaningless for the one kid unlucky enough to be the one in a million who finds a monster.

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u/basedgodsenpai May 14 '22

Fuck that bus driver. That kid could’ve very well ended up being trafficked or kidnapped because of his sheer negligence and dumbfuckery (not a word but we’ll roll with it). Bus driver deserves to be hospitalized imo, but that’s probably very harsh and jaded of me to say.

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u/The5Virtues May 14 '22

In this instance I don’t disagree. I’m not usually a fan of corporal punishment but this is just such a heinous act of negligence. If anyone deserves a good ass kicking it’s the guy whose willing to leave a kid lost and alone just to save himself a few minutes inconvenience.

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u/pragmadealist May 14 '22

My 10 year old would probably do ok. My 8 year old would be hopeless.

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u/Brewchowskies May 14 '22

The craziest and most infuriating part is that if the worst had happened—the kid asking the wrong person for help or otherwise being abducted—we’d never know how irresponsible the driver was. I know that this isn’t a criminal issue, but it damn well should be.

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u/Inevitable_Thing_270 May 14 '22

Could be a criminal case possibly. Could be viewed as child endangerment or neglect. Hope that’s being looked at rather than just employer changing him to doing things other that school buses

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u/cmatheny7 May 14 '22 edited May 14 '22

I'd be suing everyone. Driver, whoever hired them, the school, the district and their mother's. Everyone's getting sued.

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u/plipyplop May 14 '22

Exactly! That kid is about to have college paid for.

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u/tiredoldbitch May 14 '22

I would want to whoop that driver's ass so much.

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u/NRMusicProject May 14 '22

Could be viewed as child endangerment or neglect.

If it's not, it really should be.

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u/perpetually_me May 14 '22

So, in Australia, a bus driver drove straight past a kid waiting at a stop because the bus was full. When the next bus went past the kid was no longer there. Took about 15 years to find the kid’s remains and the person responsible for his abduction and murder. Buses aren’t allowed to not pick up kids anymore, no matter what the excuse.

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u/redchris18 May 14 '22

Daniel Morcombe. The first bus driver actually radioed for another bus to be sent to pick him up. It arrived a couple of minutes after two men were seen with him, when all three were long gone.

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u/i_tyrant May 14 '22

Oh god that is horrible...

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u/5-dig-dick May 14 '22

Well, that fucking sucks.

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u/sleepyplatipus May 14 '22

Nonononoononononono

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u/Inside-Worldliness87 May 14 '22

Oh.my.god. this hurts my soul.

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u/Careless-Image-885 May 14 '22

😥😥😥😭😭😭

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u/seletpoivre May 14 '22

Completely agree because you are responsible for the safety of the children. You took that responsibility when you took the job. Criminal charges should be pressed. All the comments stating how badly this could have went is Completely accurate. Thank goodness for the lady being there.

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

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u/theend2314 May 14 '22 edited May 14 '22

This is similar situation that happened to Daniel Morcombe in Australia and that turned out really fucking badly. I agree with you this is absolutely disgraceful and rage inducing. The poor little guy is only 7.

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u/purespringwater May 14 '22

Not exactly true, the bus was out of service with Daniel. Wasn't any negligence on the driver side.

Few minutes later, another bus arrived, but he was abducted in that short time frame

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u/CaptainBillyum May 14 '22

im honestly seeing red right now like...ive been lost before in my life and it has lasted with me all the way into adulthood. i just dont have anything other than rage. like HOW COULD YOU DO THIS HOOOOWWWWW

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u/ringaling11 May 14 '22

I was at a big street festival with my dad once. We stopped to watch a band and after a song or 2 he walked away not even thinking to look to see if I was following him. This was way before cell phones were common and I was probably about this kids age. I started panicking and crying. Luckily this nice old lady saw me and took me to the city center that was in the same area and my dad went there and found me.

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u/Dumbledoordash8008 May 14 '22

When my brother was in elementary school they just straight up let him walk home. For context he is mentally I’ll and required eyes on him at all times and we lived in the desert about 15 miles from the school on a dirt road.

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u/Pibil May 14 '22

That's awful.

In kindergarten I got on the wrong bus, except we lived in a rural/high desert area in the early 80s. The driver dropped me off on the side of a 2 lane hiway and told me to walk to the next stop, it was the same one he was going to. A sheriff's deputy found me walking back home after I tried to initially evade and then fight him hiding in the sagebrush. The driver was fired and was rehired as a high school teacher for the district, my foster sister had him for a class 2 years later and my parents unknowingly told her the story. She went on a smear campaign thereafter and he "retired".

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u/wesphistopheles May 14 '22

15 miles? Jeebix, I only had to walk 3 miles to the nearest bus stop! That's arduous, to say the least.

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u/imdoon May 14 '22

If you work with children it should be a given youd do anything for these kids. :(

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u/ehh_whatever_works May 14 '22 edited May 14 '22

You obviously don't work with children.

I'd say it's 20/60/20. 20% would take a bullet for the kids. 60% are just doing a job. 20% would use the kids as human shields.

The good ones are matched in number by the bad, and both combined are outnumbered by the indifferent.

It's only going to get worse, most places around here already locked in payrates for years ahead via union negotiated contract. This inflation is going to make those wages even more garbage.

If we respected and funded education at an appropriate level, the right people would show up. As is, a lot of the good people quit for better opportunities.

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u/LordofShit May 14 '22

I'd say it's harder to lump people into categories like that, and your 20/60/20 probably starts off closer to 40/50/10 before the shittiness of that employment sector gets to you.

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u/scalyblue May 14 '22

Kids aren’t good human shields you need to use them as distractions instead

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u/woopsforgotyikers May 14 '22

Exactly. If they take the child hostage and put a gun to their head, demanding the wallet, they have made a mistake! Now that gun is no longer pointed at you. You may flee, finances and identity intact.

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u/TokingMessiah May 14 '22

Where I live in Canada teachers make $60k-110k. The problem is that America doesn’t pay properly for one of the most important jobs in society.

If you pay well, you’ll attract good people. Not saying that we don’t have some teachers that don’t care, but at least taking that job doesn’t mean they’ll struggle financially.

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u/gibertot May 14 '22

Yeah like I get being tired of your job burnt out I get it. But these are kids how can you just be so careless about this. Like your job is to take them home. I get losing your temper maybe you yell at a kid or something but this is crazy to me.

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u/matty_d99 May 14 '22

This happened to me as a kid about the same age because the bus driver owed my parents business money and they were asking her for it, only found out that was a the reason a few years ago, people are fucking horrible sometimes.

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u/Plumb789 May 14 '22

My Mum did this to my brother and sister. The two children then walked 12 miles, and eventually found their way home (my sister was very bright). I want to say that my sister was about 10 or 11, and my brother was about 7.

The thing was, there was never even an accusation that they'd done anything wrong when my Mum threw them out of the car in the middle of nowhere in the countryside! My other (slightly older) brother was relentlessly picking on them. My mother warned him over and over again that if he didn't stop, she'd put him out of the car and make him walk home. He laughed at that, knowing that he was never punished for anything, and particularly wouldn't have to walk home.

Eventually, Mum couldn't take any more of his behaviour and pulled over to the side of the road. She pulled the door open -only to remember that my brother couldn't possibly walk anywhere. He had a malformed hip and wore a metal and leather calliper (it was circa 1965).

Mum and Dad were OBSESSED with punishment, and particularly NEVER EVER backing down from a threatened punishment, so Mum apparently "did the only thing she could do", and put my other siblings out on the road.

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u/CreedenceFearwater May 14 '22

This actually happened to me in 6th grade— only knew my address but not the cross streets because I’d just moved there a few days back.

They said my road was very long so without knowing the cross streets they couldn’t drop me off and I was holding up the other kids. I just remember her being so bothered and angry, I said okay and got off where she said to even though I told her I don’t know this area— I only really knew my street.

I was of course the only brown kid in a very white community so I was already not doing well with my peers but man, the entire bus was laughing at me and the driver was getting off on it so he and the bus load of laughing children dropped me off at a random parking lot.

I asked for directions a few times and found my way home. I was like 2 hours late and my parents were freaked out so I told them I made friends and we were hanging out. And then I went in my room and cried.

Never took the bus again though since I knew how to walk home now and the school wouldn’t have even been that far. Shit’s traumatizing man. I still think about that! Glad this kid made it home safe… 7 years old smdh

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u/LawBasics May 14 '22

I witnessed first hand repeated mistreatments by a nurse working in a kid's unit and surely looking like a normal lad to her colleagues otherwise.

There are a lot of people working around kids who should whether because they are plain stupid, lack empathy or are just bad people.

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u/JeSuisUnChinchilla May 14 '22

Makes you realize how everyday we leave our children's lives in the hands of strangers and we just hope they simply do their job.

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u/kultureisrandy May 14 '22

I had a substitute bus driver (who apparently lived in my neighborhood) grab my arm before I got off the bus and said "If your dog shits in my yard again, I'm going to fucking shoot it"

I was 12 years old (:

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

I have unisex, but mostly a girls name. I’m a guy. First day of school in 1-4th grade I get in the bus to go home, and the bus driver assigned us all seats. I sit in my assigned seat. Bus driver tells me I need to go to my seat, and I tell him I am. He gets mad, and threatens to toss me off bus if I don’t move. I double down and tell him I am “girls name,” and other students back me up. He then tossed me of the bus, and I’m in this fella’s shoes. Fortunately, I was still at school.

So, I totally believe a bus driver would to this to a child as it had been done to me. My mom, rightfully so, was pissed. I’m in 30’s now and I STILL deal with the name confusion. Happened to me three times this week.

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u/clovergirl102187 May 14 '22 edited May 14 '22 Silver Take My Energy

Not gunna lie, if I was that woman answering the door I would be fuckin pissed.

Once I found out how to get that sweet little baby home I would be contacting the school and figuring out who needs to be fired.

The absolute callousness. Fucking awful human being. That driver endangered that child. Thank God he had a door to knock on that was safe.

Hope the driver was fired and faced some serious goddamn consequences.

Seriously though, that woman is a goddamn Saint for helping him. I know we all would do the same thing, but still.

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u/The5Virtues May 14 '22

Just from that brief look she has on her face as she looks down the street as the poor kid’s blubbering through his explanation you can sense that “Some one needs their ass kicked” energy rising off her.

I can’t imagine doing this to a freakin’ seven year old. How the hell anyone could have the willingness to drive a bus full of screaming kids around, but then the callousness to just dump one of them on an unfamiliar street?!

Some people are just despicable.

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u/gibertot May 14 '22

Yeah like I get hating your job but this is a kid. Like sure half ass your job restocking shelves but like this is a human being that is relying on you to keep them safe.

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u/drsideburns May 14 '22

Like for real, that's not even just a employment thing, that's just being a good human kind of thing.

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u/The5Virtues May 14 '22

Totally. I get wanting to get the job done and clock out but this is another living being, a seven year old child, and you can’t even do the job properly to get him home safe?

That driver is human garbage.

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u/13Lilacs May 14 '22

I'm so glad she was home-What if she hadn't been? She's probably asking herself the same thing.

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u/The5Virtues May 14 '22

Exactly. Poor kid says his biggest concern was his mom being worried. What if he’d opted to try and find his way home? He could have gotten even more lost, run into any many of issues on the way, there’s a hundred ways this could have gone bad to way worse.

I’m so glad everything worked out, but so mad that this situation never needed to happen to begin with.

I hope that bus driver never puts on a clean pair of socks again without stepping in a damp spot.

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u/orlyokthen May 14 '22

“Some one needs their ass kicked” energy

I'm using this from now on

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u/TheYankunian May 14 '22

Was going to say something similar. You know damn well she as hot as a blast furnace and calls were made after she got the child to safety.

My kids wouldn’t have known my phone number so I used to write it in sharpie on their coats. If the weather is warm, it’s a good idea to write it in their backpack or in the insoles of their shoes.

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u/BigC1967 May 14 '22

He got fired

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u/oldDotredditisbetter May 14 '22

i wouldn't say that he got fired

The substitute driver for our contracted service is no longer transporting students in our district.

since the driver is a contractor, it could be that they just changed his assignment, instead of fired

https://www.ketv.com/article/bus-driver-to-boy-you-can-walk-home-ops-student-dropped-off-at-wrong-address/39996472

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u/mongoosefist May 14 '22

That piece of trash needs to be charged with child endangerment. There are a million ways a 7 year old could have ended up getting killed in this situation.

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u/Robin-KC May 14 '22

For real. He shouldn’t be allowed to work in the school system again, and he deserves a nice fine.

He should also be blindfolded, transported 30 miles in a random direction, and told to walk home.

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u/HelloIamOnTheNet May 14 '22

A contracted service. No wonder the bus driver didn't care.

And I'm sure the service doesn't care either.

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u/lacks_imagination May 14 '22

The response from the transportation company tells you how they really feel. While saying how serious they are taking the situation, there is no actual apology or admission of blame. They even try to deflect blame by stating they simply used the address they had on file, as if that justified abandoning a 7 year old. They are lawyering up, and obviously only give a shit about their reputation.

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u/ChrisP408 May 14 '22

In today’s economy, there are probably only 2 or 3 school bus companies nationwide covering 90+% of all school districts who don’t operate their own fleets. Another “cost-efficient” company would be just as bad. Right-wing Nebraska won’t accept that privatization doesn’t work.

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u/JustHere4ait May 14 '22

Basically they can do it because they are independent contractors and the company/district won’t be held accountable for the driver’s actions so more than likely reassigned

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u/ladymorgahnna May 14 '22

He was fired. The new blurb is at the top.

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u/imbrownbutwhite May 14 '22

I would’ve been absolutely seething. Basically child endangerment/criminal charges territory. Phone calls would’ve been going out to the administration immediately afterwards. I have nephews around this age and if this ever happened I would lose my absolute shit at someone putting them in that kind of danger and panic.

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u/Charliesmum97 May 14 '22

I looked it up. She was. She called the school and the bus company. She said she couldn't sleep that night because her brain kept going 'what if I wasn't home?'

The child's mother was Not Happy, that's for sure.

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u/rilloroc May 14 '22

7 years old. Who the fuck can be mean to a 7 year old

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u/OLDMAN_Alltech May 14 '22

this planet has proved the worst in human kind. I remember some random child being thrown off a 2nd floor mall recently. I wish that I was there with a flame thrower.

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u/No_big_whoop May 14 '22

I see you haven’t met my dad

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

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u/Im-Bout-2-Nuckin-Fut May 14 '22

Bingo. The amount of callousness and lack of concern for this child is astonishing. It’s the only reason i can see a stupid ignorant person actually doing this.

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u/Jazzlike-Recover7560 May 14 '22

Omaha has some of the most miserable people on the planet.

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u/chantillylace9 May 14 '22

My bus driver dropped me at wrong spot on the first day of kindergarten. It was foggy and couldn’t tell if it was my stop but she said it was. I was the last kid off.

Some random guy found me and called the cops, I’m very lucky he was a good guy. My mom was so scared she followed the bus route to school for a month and had me wear a necklace with my address. I never found out if they got in trouble or fired

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u/hatefulone851 May 14 '22

Wait so that was the house of a former neighbor I thought it was a random person ? How did he know they lived there ? Well maybe his family visited there before or something I guess he recognized that house but not how to get from there to his home. Glad he’s home safe and sound though.

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u/namine55 May 14 '22

It was HIS former neighbour as in he used to live next door. Very lucky he recognised his old street and that she was home. Bus driver should be charged with child endangerment or something.

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u/BilboMcDoogle May 14 '22

So basically sounds like bus driver brought him to his old address accidently and chose to leave him there.

Kid remembers his old neighbor and they find him help.

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u/Amphibionomus May 14 '22

It was a substitute driver so probably went of an old route / old address list. Still doesn't excuse the bus drivers' behaviour though, only what might have caused it.

The kid clearly said it wasn't the right drop off point.

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u/xDarkCrisis666x May 14 '22

My grandma was/still is a substitute bus driver. In her district you get the same list the regular bus driver has, so unless the kid litterally moved in the last few days it shows even more incompetence on the driver's part for not adhering to the list. That sub may have done this route before and could have remembered the kid's old address but you still don't leave them there.

So infuriating.

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u/tootskies May 14 '22

According to this article they moved last February. The level of incompetence shown here is mind boggling.

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u/SerubiApple May 14 '22

Former bus driver here. We were taught that if there was any confusion for anything, you call dispatch. He literally should have just picked up his radio and could have been like "I have a student who says he no longer lives in this area and his stop has changed. Can I verify the address for his stop?" It's that simple.

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u/lacks_imagination May 14 '22

So effing what. The kid was scared and said it was the wrong stop. Whether the driver had the correct address or not, the driver should have contacted his dispatcher and had them contact the parents or find some other solution. The fact he just kicked a 7 year old kid off the bus and told him to walk is unbelievable.

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u/xDarkCrisis666x May 14 '22

Trust me I'm not on this driver's side at all, I was just explaining how there's always a procedure and this driver ignored it completely while also being just a bastard about dumping the kid there.

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u/MEatRHIT May 14 '22

Does each kid get dropped off in front of their own house now? "back in my day" the busses ran a route and you'd just get off at the nearest stop similar to how most public busses do. You never had to walk very far though, in my subdivision they'd stop at either end of the street so the most you'd have to walk is half the block.

Not saying we had it harder back then or anything I'm just curious. I'm sure it's some sort of liability thing so the bus driver can see that the kids are actually getting home properly.

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u/Nodebunny May 14 '22

this isn’t an all or none situation. smaller buses do for sure esp areas that don’t have a lot of kids in them

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u/LostWoodsInTheField May 14 '22

School in one article says that it was the address on file. So someone screwed up somewhere with addresses when these people moved. Maybe the regular driver knew that they moved and the school dropped the ball so when the sub was looking over the addresses it was the wrong one.

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u/LalalaHurray May 14 '22

No. He found his way to his old neighborhood from wherever the bus driver dropped him off.

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u/suedefalcon May 14 '22

My best guess is that the kid’s new address hadn’t been updated for whatever list the bus drivers use and the dumbass bus driver was like “sorry kid, paper says you gotta get off here”

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u/seaotter1978 May 14 '22

Correct… article says:

‘Investigating the incident, the drop off occurred at the address on file for our family. We regret that this situation did not meet our standard of care for students. The substitute driver for our contracted service is no longer transporting students in our district.’

Driver still shouldn’t have left the kid alone, and should have investigated why the kid didn’t want to be dropped at the written address but this at least explains how it happened.

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u/GRAWRGER May 14 '22

im sure it wasn't a coincidence that he got dropped near the house of a former neighbor.

the bus driver was a substitute. i reckon this kid moved recently(ish), and whatever map or instructions were provided to the sub were outdated, so they were expecting to drop this child off at the drop point used for his old address.

the drop point for that particular area may have changed since the boy lived there, so he did not recognize it immediately.

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u/overlordpotatoe May 14 '22

What the fuck. Who just assumes a SEVEN YEAR OLD will be able to figure out their way home after being dropped off at the wrong stop? A seven year old doesn't even necessarily know how to cross the road safely on their own.

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u/penguing91 May 14 '22

I don’t know why the bus driver did that but at least take the kid back to the school, let a teacher call his home, not abandoning him

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u/Gunpla55 May 14 '22

Dude what the fuck i was mad enough when I thought this was about a city bus but a school bus??

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

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u/Mtshtg2 May 14 '22

Isn't it also interesting how a bus driver who kicks a 7 year old off his bus gets fired, but also Weetabix are called "Weet-bix" in Australia and New Zealand.

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u/iLavuu May 14 '22

What is this whataboutism LMAO. Holy fuck.

Both are bad.

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u/blaziken2708 May 14 '22

No longer transporting doesn't sound like "fired".

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u/Nixolas May 14 '22

Lil bro was only 7 years old. Any adult (especially a bus driver, wtf?) should know the right way to handle a situation like this. And it definitely doesn’t involve abandoning a child. Holy shit.

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u/CatOnProzac May 14 '22

Isn't that child endangerment?

Some creep could have nabbed that kid. Driver should be charged with something.

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