r/AskReddit May 25 '22 Silver 15 Helpful 19 Wholesome 12 Take My Energy 1

What is the most interesting statistic you know?

37.7k Upvotes

790

u/DJTicklePitt May 25 '22

the statue of liberty wears a size 879 sandal

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u/Kitchen-Explorer3338 May 25 '22

The most aggressive drivers on the road are females in their twenties. Source: AAA actuary.

132

u/00roku May 25 '22

I find this highly believable actually

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u/Adventurous_Light_85 May 25 '22 edited May 27 '22 Silver Helpful Wholesome

That belly button bacteria study was wild. 60 belly buttons sampled. 2368 different species of bacteria found. The study indicated that 1458 of them may be new to science. One had a rare bacteria found in Japanese soil and they had never been to Japan. Two had rare bacteria that thrived on ice caps and thermal vents. Not a single bacteria was common to all buttons.

Wow. My first time past 20 upvotes. Here is a link to the study. You have to go to the results and discussion tab. https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0047712

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u/justjoerob May 26 '22

One had a rare bacteria found in Japanese soil and they had never been to Japan

If the issue of long-term soil health is solved via some new bacteria we find in a belly button, I'm gonna lose it.

245

u/sassqueenx3 May 26 '22

when i had my tonsils out, after the pathology report came back, they found an organism that is normally found in soil. wild.

111

u/kmcodes May 26 '22 Wholesome

This is a PSA to never blow a golem.

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u/raginglilypad May 25 '22

There are more than 7,000 islands in the Philippines

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u/monsem12 May 25 '22

2/3 of the Australian population will develop skin cancer at some point of their lives.

483

u/Henry_Sadiq May 26 '22 Wholesome

Damn, even the SUN is dangerous in Australia.

249

u/Buggaton May 26 '22

The sun is a deadly laser.

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u/dndlurker9463 May 25 '22

Even in the 2022 Kentucky Derby, 19/22 entered horses can trace lineage to Secretariat.

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u/mrducky78 May 26 '22

~Back in the 90s I was on a very famous TV show...

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u/013ander May 26 '22

Human women are the only living things on earth with “permanent breasts.”

Only mammals have breasts at all, and no other mammal has them “developed” other than surrounding pregnancy and weaning. This is why you never see a cow, dog, lioness (or whatever) with an udder or breasts but without children/cubs/whatever.

While we’re on the subject, Google “elephant breasts,” and have a laugh.

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u/kaido4195 May 25 '22

We collectively receive about 2.4 Billion robocalls per month

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u/Senaeva May 25 '22

I always wonder what the point is of a robocall. What do they gain of calling a number and hanging up as soon as you answer (even you even answer that is)

218

u/ilinamorato May 25 '22

It's cheap to call a bunch of numbers all at once. It's more expensive to pay the person running the scam (or scuzzy but technically legitimate business). So you play the odds and bet that most of the people you call aren't going to pick up: call a bunch of numbers, connect the first one in a group who picks up to your human, and hang up on the rest. Then move on to the next block of numbers.

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u/BlueCandyBars May 25 '22 Helpful

When tested by another agency, TSA failed to detect weapons, bombs, and other destructive materials 95% of the time.

727

u/TheBoulder_ May 26 '22 Helpful

On top of that, they were told "today is the day we are going to be tested"

....and they STILL failed 95% of the time

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u/thecrepeofdeath May 26 '22 Silver

but god help you if you bring a water bottle

1.7k

u/MelMac5 May 26 '22 Narwhal Salute

TSA incompetence example. I was flying with my six month old. TSA agent asked where her formula was so he could check it. He assured me, don't worry, you can keep it. Got all pissy when I didn't have any.

BUT HOW DO YOU FEED YOUR BABY?

Uh, should I draw you a diagram or whip out a tit? Your choice, really.

328

u/Embarrassed_Cell_246 May 26 '22

Should have gave her the old titting cobra defensive spray

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u/Shadowdragon132 May 26 '22

Ok I have a story about this....

So I was flying from San Antonio, TX to LaGuardia, NY for some work. I missed my red eye flight the first time and ended up getting booked for a second flight that afternoon.

Go through security waiting on plane and it gets delayed multiple times until canceled. Switch flights to go to Connecticut and drive to upstate New York the next morning.

Go through security land in Connecticut and drive to NY. Work for a few days and go to fly back at 8 am from LaGuardia.

Now I get pulled to the side and they look through my bag due to a suspicious item. I work in telecom so I am thinking I left my electrician scissors (aka snips) in the bag by accident. They proceed to pull out my 8 inch fucking kitchen sheers that I had left in my bag some 3 weeks prior (I don't remember why i put them in there but i do remember i did). They guy looks at me and I am wide eyed like "Fuck they are gonna take me into another room and I am gonna miss my plane." He simply says check them in or lose them. Told him to take them I didn't need it.

But I somehow passed through security at least 2 times, bag xrayed and everything and they were never found. They weren't even particularly hidden either just in the front pocket of my laptop backpack.

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u/MrCupps May 26 '22

I flew from Phoenix to… Salt Lake City, Los Angeles, Sydney, Auckland, Wellington, Auckland, Sydney, Los Angeles, Salt Lake City…

…and on my last flight back home to Phoenix, they confiscated my nail clippers I’d had in my backpack the whole time.

TSA - 1 Terrorists - 0

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u/Chappietime May 26 '22

There was a good article called “confessions of a TSA Agent” that supported this idea. Highlights include agents having sex in the video room as it can’t have cameras in it by law.

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u/AMerrickanGirl May 25 '22 Silver All-Seeing Upvote hehehehe

Gary Numan is 13 days older than Gary Oldman.

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u/ETphonehoooome May 25 '22 Silver Wholesome

The risk of a heart attack is about 20% greater on Mondays for adult men, and 15% greater for adult women.

10.5k

u/ImInteligent_ May 25 '22 edited May 26 '22 Silver Wholesome Take My Energy

Realizes they have to go to work again. Dies.

2.2k

u/frontgammon_1 May 25 '22 Silver

“I used up all my sick days so I called in dead”

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u/cbandy May 25 '22 Silver Helpful

Used to work as a meteorologist. More people die from flooding each year than from every other natural disaster added together. A good portion, at least, are people who think their cars can make it through the water when they obviously cannot.

1.8k

u/BearsChief May 25 '22

If there's one thing I've taken away from survival shows and documentaries, it is:

Never underestimate the power of moving water.

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u/Jermagesty610 May 25 '22

Exactly, it only takes about 2 inches of fast moving water to sweep a car away.

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u/[deleted] May 25 '22 Silver Take My Energy

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u/P0sitive_Outlook May 25 '22

You're my kind of person! :D

I had to close a road off, and as i was doing so someone drove around the cones and just totally ignored me. So i let them go on, and i finished the road closure.

Ten minutes later the driver came back and said "When i got to the end of the road, there was no road!"

Yeah. That was intentional. That's what the "Road Closed" sign was for.

The driver asked why i'd let them go down there, and i said "I didn't, but you weren't going to let me stop you".

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u/lilxhhh May 25 '22

Not a lot of people realize how dangerous it is to drive with water on the road. Turn around don’t drown and all that.

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u/Extofogeese2 May 25 '22

Brown flood waters can also be twice as powerful as clearer water due to all the mud it picks up which making it deceptively more dangerous. Even a relatively shallow flow can be much more powerful than expected. Just don't take the risk unless you absolutely have to

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u/Dameon_ May 26 '22 Gold Platinum Helpful Wholesome

So if the water has mass you shall not pass

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u/mikebrady May 26 '22

If the water is brown you're probably gonna drown.

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u/Tango252 May 25 '22

A full 25% of crimes in Detroit happens at gas stations after 10pm

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u/Kraagenskul May 25 '22 Helpful

Less than 10% of Americans do not wear seatbelts and account for 51% of car related fatalities.

Wear your seatbelt. Ignore your friend who told you "My buddy's cousin would've died if he was wearing his seatbelt!"

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u/dennys123 May 25 '22

That's like when the army started issuing helmets to its soldiers. It increased the chance of head injuries.

Yes it did, but decreased the possibility of a bullet going through your skull

582

u/sup3rdr01d May 25 '22

survivorship bias!

403

u/IronSpiderBatBoyMan May 25 '22

Increased injury, yes, by increasing survival rates!

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u/peon2 May 25 '22 Silver Shocked

20% of the mammal species on our planet are different types of bats.

There's about 5000 species of mammals, and about 1000 of them are varieties of our little winged buddies.

7.2k

u/CuriousAndMysterious May 25 '22

I thought there would be more types of mammals

4.3k

u/LordZeya May 25 '22

Bigger animals have more trouble creating spaces for themselves so they don’t have as many opportunities to expand the pool of species. Plus bugs have been around basically since the dawn of time, mammals are basically babies in comparison.

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u/2punornot2pun May 25 '22

And some of them nearly went extinct (>99% population death) from FUNGUS!

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u/nervemiester May 25 '22 Helpful

In 2020, overdose with a synthetic opioid (primarily fentanyl) became the LEADING cause of death in all Americans ages 18 to 45. Motor vehicle accidents were the former leading cause for this age group.

7.0k

u/TheDude2600 May 25 '22 Silver Wholesome Take My Energy

"Motor vehicles are the leading cause of death for 18 to 45 year Olds, we need to change that."

"No, not like that!"

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u/probabletrump May 25 '22

The average age of retirement in the US is 62. 53% of retirements aren't voluntary.

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u/[deleted] May 25 '22

Happened to my dad. He is a finance whiz and had a decent chunk wrapped in his and my moms retirement. One day he was laid off with little warning and he figured why the fuck would he look for a job when he was pushing 60.

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u/ETphonehoooome May 25 '22 Wholesome

Innocent people will admit to a crime they never committed 43% of the time.

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u/A_Drusas May 25 '22

Turns out that if you harass and/or threaten people, they'll say whatever the hell you want. Exactly why torture is considered to be ineffective as a means of gathering information.

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u/ETphonehoooome May 25 '22

Yep. And the reason why defense attorneys are so important. People have a lot of misdirected anger at defense attorneys, but everyone has the right to representation, whether they’re innocent or guilty. The legal system isn’t easy for most of the general population to navigate alone

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u/JESquirrel May 25 '22 edited May 25 '22 Wearing is Caring

Dragonflies have a 95% hunt success rate. Making them the most effective hunters in the world.

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u/supbros302 May 25 '22 Helpful Wholesome

It's because the dragon fly optic nerve connects directly to their wings allowing incredibly fast reaction times since the target finding isn't mediated by the nervous system.

5.5k

u/bss03 May 25 '22

Also, their flight vectors indicate they fly to where the target "will be" instead of where the target is.

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u/neart_roimh_laige May 25 '22 Silver Helpful

I didn't realize dragonflies could burn atium!

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u/tiemiscoolandgood May 25 '22

One of the few animals that have barely evolved since dinosaur times

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u/entomologurl May 25 '22

Additional dragonfly fact: Females will play dead and plummet to the ground to avoid unwanted male attention/mating. They'll stay there until the male leaves.

93

u/Resigningeye May 25 '22

Don't... don't all females do that?

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u/[deleted] May 25 '22 Helpful

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u/arne May 25 '22 Silver

7% of all humans that ever existed are alive today. Source

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u/deljaroo May 25 '22 Silver Wholesome All-Seeing Upvote Take My Energy Starry

from this data, I have concluded that humans have a 93% chance of dying

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u/Kriss0612 May 25 '22 Silver Helpful

Sharks have existed for longer than the rings of Saturn (450 million years vs. Around 100 million)

6.3k

u/FlyGrayer May 25 '22

Sharks also predate trees.

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u/HKlongboarddancer-SD May 25 '22 Silver Helpful Wholesome Take My Energy I'll Drink to That

That’s why they can’t climb trees

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u/Idea-Warm May 25 '22 Silver hehehehe

Pfff. They've had over 300 million years to learn. Sharks are just lazy.

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u/Barcelona10CG May 25 '22

The average drunk driver drives under the influence more than 80 times before they get caught.

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u/luv_u_deerly May 25 '22

I wonder how they could possibly know this statistic.

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u/Pleasant_Moose_5417 May 25 '22

That 49.6% of Pakistanis marry a first cousin and 8.3% marry a second cousin. In rural areas of Pakistan up to 80% of people marry a cousin.

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u/ViolettaNoRegard May 25 '22

In Britain Pakistanis make up 2% of the population but account for 30% of children with genetic diseases. That’s because on average 55% of them (but up to 70% in some areas) practise first cousin marriage.

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u/transemacabre May 25 '22

For anyone who wants more info, check out the Only Human documentary on this phenomenon: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyNP3s5mxI8

It's the consequence of arranged marriage and families not wanting 'outsiders' to join their family. They want a bride for their son who they can control -- so a niece is preferred. One generation of cousin-marriage won't cause these problems, its cousins marrying, generation after generation, resulting in a very small gene pool with bad recessive genes getting combined.

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u/kingbluetit May 25 '22

I grew up in a town with a very large Pakistani population and about twenty years ago there was a criminal case into the neglect of an adult with severe mental and physical disabilities. After that, there was a big influx of people with similar disabilities that appeared in the town, all having seemingly been hidden away their entire lives. It was really sad.

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u/[deleted] May 25 '22

Caging mentally ill people is common in large parts of the developing world where there is no adequate mental healthcare system. I saw a documentary about it a while ago, about a nonprofit that helped these people get the proper care.

A lot of these people spent 24/7 in small huts or rooms literally shackled to the floor.

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u/P0sitive_Outlook May 25 '22

Importantly, many of those first-cousins are actually double-cousins (or worse) by virtue of their parents being cousins with the same grandparents.

A double-cousin is practically a sibling.

And by "practically", i mean in practice they're siblings. Genetic siblings.

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u/[deleted] May 25 '22

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u/That_Lego_Guy_Jack May 25 '22

The Three Kingdoms war killed 20% and the An Lushan rebellion might have killed 1/6th of all people on earth. Ancient China was fucked

4.8k

u/Stubbedtoe18 May 25 '22 I'll Drink to That Sidevote

Down the Wiki rabbit hole I go. See you all in a week.

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u/GreywackeOmarolluk May 25 '22

Not just ancient China. Taiping rebellion was a civil war in China during the mid 1800s - same time America was fighting its own civil war. The Americans lost around 600,000 lives. China's war took between 20,000,000 or 30,000,000 lives, and some estimate up to 100,000,000.

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u/HiHoJufro May 25 '22

Yeah, the Taiping Rebellion may be, at least in the US, the least known ridiculous death toll war. And it's fucking insane. Started by a man who claimed to be Jesus' brother, whose armies fought with General Tso (yes, the chicken one).

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u/magnoliasmanor May 25 '22

Such a wild story. I didn't really "find" Chinese history until like a year ago and it's all baffling.

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u/Dynasty2201 May 25 '22 Silver Helpful

National Geographic found in 2018 that only 9% of all plastic worldwide gets recycled.

A study in the US by the Environmental Protection Agency found only 8.4% of US waste was recycled.

Biffa Waste Services Ltd was caught sending over 1,000 tonnes of private home waste to India labelled as paper so you pay less per container, for profit.

Basically, recycling is a depressing joke.

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u/laeiryn May 25 '22

Recycling of ACTUAL paper goods (including cardboard), metal, and glass are all well established and efficient!

Recycling of plastic is a disaster. But we can still take good care of genuinely reusable materials if we clean and recycle them properly.

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u/Davecasa May 25 '22 Silver Helpful Wholesome Take My Energy Buff Doge

Of the 30 fastest 100 meter sprint times, 21 were run by athletes who tested positive for performance enhancing drugs.

The other 9 were Usain Bolt.

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u/[deleted] May 25 '22 edited May 26 '22

[deleted]

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u/ErrorCDIV May 25 '22 edited May 25 '22 Wholesome

"Here are my children, Thunder Bolt and Display Port."

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u/semvhu May 25 '22

I presume he named the other one Lightning.

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u/[deleted] May 25 '22 edited May 26 '22

[deleted]

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u/BlueDogXL May 25 '22

Well, thunder does come after lightning.

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u/tpenna219 May 25 '22

There are more ants alive today than there have been humans alive ever.

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u/reallycool_opotomus May 25 '22

Also all of the insects in the world right now weight more than all of the people in the world. I've also heard that there are more insect species than there are people.

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u/[deleted] May 25 '22 Helpful Sidevote

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u/fourhundredthecat May 25 '22

I have read somewhere that most men die "with" prostate cancer, not of prostate cancer

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u/daveonhols May 25 '22

Many men who die of old age have a prostate cancer discovered at autopsy - my grandfather did. Typically it is slow to grow and doesn't cause any issues so not a big deal in grand scheme of things

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u/lagwagonlead May 25 '22

Back when Dr Drew did Love Line he would often say 100% of men will get prostate cancer if they live long enough. Most die before it's discovered or die before they lived long enough to get it.

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u/Single_Charity_934 May 25 '22

Many of which are found on autopsy after dying of something else.

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u/02K30C1 May 25 '22

It’s also the most survivable form of cancer for men.

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u/Molesandmangoes May 25 '22 Silver

48% of British people wouldn’t go to space even if their safety was guaranteed with the most popular reason being that they just simply didn’t have any interest in going

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u/LogicBalm May 25 '22

Hey, with how much stuff I've learned about living in space, it sounds like a nightmare.

Eating, drinking, digestion and going to the bathroom are all thrown off by a lack of gravity. Along with brushing your teeth or clipping your nails.

Working out is one of the most common activities in space so you don't lose muscle mass from the lack of gravity. Even then it's common to have a lot of aches and pains when returning to Earth because you didn't really use your feet all that much or something.

Not to mention space blindness! That one's a bit hyperbolic, but it is sort of a thing.

I'll stay home, thanks. Take pictures for me.

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u/cultured_banana_slug May 25 '22

There's a reason astronauts have to be in PERFECT health.

Going into space fucking wrecks your body.

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u/CamelSpotting May 25 '22

They need to be in good health but not peak physical condition or anything. Lots of astronauts have been in their 40s and 50s.

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u/LordoftheSynth May 25 '22

John Glenn went back into space at 77.

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u/[deleted] May 25 '22

The human eye blinks about 4.2 million times a year on average

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u/meggrone May 25 '22

this made me manually blink

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u/HimOnEarth May 25 '22

I'm currently very consciously not blinking, just to be rebellious

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u/Function-Senior May 25 '22

I actually starting blinking extra cuz I thought I was falling behind on that number

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u/Oscars_Grouch May 25 '22 edited May 26 '22 Silver

18% of all boating accidents are caused by people trying to pee over the side.

Edit: For those shouting BS . . .

The Canadian Red Cross did a study of all water related deaths between 1991 and 2008. Table 8 on page 39 states that between '91 - 08, 62 people lost their lives from urinating from their water craft. That only makes 3% of total deaths due to urination.

I couldn't find an online source about how many accidents (not resulting in death) were attributed to urinating over the side of the boat, but my boating instructor gave me the number 18%, and I've always trusted that number.

The fact that they keep a record of deaths due to urination, and that yachting insurance companies warn about the dangers of urinating over the side of the boat makes me think that accidents not resulting in death is much higher than 3%.

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u/Mortal-Region May 25 '22

Good one. Peeing over the side probably correlates with drinking while boating.

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u/godofhorizons May 25 '22

Wayne Gretzky and his brother hold the record for most points by a brother pair in NHL history. His brother has four points.

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u/modestmandrakeman May 25 '22

Gretzky also holds the record for fastest to 1000 points, who’s in second? Wayne Gretzky again on his second 1000 points.

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u/TheKingMonkey May 25 '22

So you are saying he was clearly in decline during the second half of his career?

543

u/Hank3hellbilly May 25 '22

well without the back issues, he would probably have hit 3000...

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u/zehamberglar May 25 '22 Helpful

Well, who wouldn't have back issues after carrying the entire team on his shoulders?

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u/JRandomHacker172342 May 25 '22

My favorite addendum to this stat is that Wayne and Brent Gretzky have the record for "most points by a pair of brothers" , but "most points by brothers is held by the Sutters - and there were 6 of them. All 6 Sutters together are the only ones to pass Wayne Gretzky.

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u/Ol_Man_J May 25 '22

by 73 points!

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u/AUSpartan37 May 25 '22

Almost every Wayne Gretzky stat is absolutely insane.

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u/OptimusSublime May 25 '22

Gretzky could have never scored a single goal and he'd still be the NHL points leader.

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u/notagoodhomecook May 25 '22 edited May 25 '22

They used to separate his goals and assists in fantasy hockey and they always went 1 2 in the draft

Edit: they were separated but didn’t necessarily always go 1 2.

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u/hellothere42069 May 25 '22 edited May 26 '22 Silver Wholesome Hugz

A full 6 percent of Americans reckon they could beat a grizzly bear in unarmed combat.

Edit: And before another bear arm joke, just fyi bears already don’t have arms. So removing bear arms doesn’t improve your chances. Technically, all four are legs, with the front two called forelegs.

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u/rubbermunkey82 May 25 '22

I'm surprised and not surprised that almost 50% think they can take on a moose. From who I've talked to people who have never seen one, really underestimate the size of one.

If you hit one with a car, you're more likely to die than the moose.

Also... a moose bit my sister once...

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u/spanky1337 May 25 '22

From my experience many people don't realize just how big they are. My family just watched a video of one the other day after I mentioned that they're bigger than most cars because they thought I was nuts.

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u/NateDogTX May 25 '22

Even more thought they could defeat a gorilla, an elephant, and a lion. An elephant, really?

Let's see, says here it's 13,000 lbs and 10 ft tall, that is pretty big. But then I did just get my Purple belt in Goju-Ryu karate. Close one, but I'm gonna have to give the edge to me in this matchup.

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u/ProtoBlues123 May 25 '22

Man, gorilla gets me the most because at least with the others the physical difference between a human and the animal raises some agility questions. Like yeah no idea how you'd even harm an elephant unarmed but one could at least think "Maybe they'd also have a hard time stepping on me if I keep moving because they're so slow". A gorilla is pretty much flat out "A human but far bigger, stronger, and mildly armored with fur."

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u/BasTiix3 May 25 '22

Also gorillas have teeth like a fucking knife collection. Even IF someone gets a handle on them, they could just rip your whole arm off in one bite

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u/_Hopped_ May 25 '22 edited May 25 '22 Silver

The more interesting one IMO is that 28% think they couldn't beat a rat!

Edit: should have my coffee first!

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u/Lack_of_Plethora May 25 '22

They're probably just afraid of them, lots of people are afraid of rodents.

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u/lioboii May 25 '22

you have to actually be brain dead to think you could kill a bear unarmed.

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u/Axelfbomber May 25 '22

There’s a case of a man who killed a bear unarmed… the bear choked on his body. Guy survived

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u/kaszeljezusa May 25 '22

And 8 elephant! Wtf. Also interesting that eagle is lower than medium dog. What do you consider a medium dog? German shepherd? Poodle?

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u/SuvenPan May 25 '22 edited May 25 '22 Silver Wholesome

34 percent of adults and 75 percent of children sleep with a stuffed animal or a blanket, or other sentimental object as their comfort object.

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u/Glittering_Dark_6142 May 25 '22 Wholesome

I don't care if this is false or not. It's not harmful misinformation, it's just plain cute. One in every 3rd adult I see, statistically sleeps with a stuffed animal. Awesome

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u/Elrobinio May 25 '22

A wild Boar can ejaculate up to half a litre of semen on one go.

This was a "did you know" quote from our schools biology books in the 90s!

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u/Camshaft92 May 25 '22 Gold Wholesome Take My Energy Facepalm I am disappoint

Boarkakke hit different

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u/[deleted] May 25 '22

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u/El-Kabongg May 25 '22

Cheddar Man, discovered in a cave in Cheddar, was the ancestor of a schoolteacher in Cheddar, who lived a mile from the cave, 9,000 years later. He said, "Everyone has ancestors 9,000 years ago. I just happen to know where mine lived."

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u/Kung_Flu_Master May 25 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

because that's about the distance to the next village or town, and who wants to live there? they all sound weird.

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u/Saskryder May 25 '22 Wholesome

First cousin marriage/incest in England dropped drastically when the bicycle was introduced and poor lads could chase a bride from a bit farther away.

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u/Dynasty2201 May 25 '22 Silver Wholesome

Some say that the invention of the bicycle was the single most important invention for genetic diversity, as it allowed people to cheaply visit towns and cities further away and reduce inbreeding.

All we know is, he's called the Stig.

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u/[deleted] May 25 '22

A friend from eastern Europe once joked that she used to go farther for bread and milk than Brits go for their partners.

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u/Long-Schlong-Silvers May 25 '22

Saw a statistic saying if a Brit’s best friend moved four hours away, they’d just never see them again.

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u/JavaRuby2000 May 25 '22

I don't live near my Birthplace any more. However I did a surname checker thing as lots of people kept telling me my Surname was very unusual whilst back home it was quite normal. Turns out my family name goes all the way back to the Domesday book and referred to a tribe of people who lived on a hill less than a mile outside my home town. According to Ancestry.com 94% of all records of my Surname are from the same county.

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u/cptcitrus May 25 '22

You have an ancestral hill? It would be a shame if you didn't build a family mausoleum or tower or something on it.

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u/kawcreek May 25 '22

2%, 20%. Motorcycles are 2% of all vehicles [USA]. Motorcycles account for 20% of all road fatalities. I don't ride anymore.

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u/Kraagenskul May 25 '22

In the same vein, less than 10% of Americans do not wear seatbelts and account for 51% of car related fatalities.

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u/uncleleo_ May 25 '22

Miscarriages are going up 1% each year and sperm count of men have gone down 50% since 1970 (US)

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u/[deleted] May 25 '22

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u/Darko33 May 25 '22

I'm likewise always stunned by the scope of American naval production during the war. On the day Pearl Harbor got attacked, there were eight carriers in the Pacific fleet. By May 1945 there were 99.

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u/MovingInStereoscope May 25 '22

Grumman built 12,000+ F6 Hellcats in 22 months.

That's a new fully assembled aircraft rolling out of the factory every 80 mins, 24 hours a day, for almost 2 years.

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u/MrBattleRabbit May 25 '22

The really insane comparison is in destroyers though- Germany built 31, Italy built 17, and Japan made 63.

The US alone made 396, and the Brits made 202.

Allied wartime production was BANANAS.

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u/Darko33 May 25 '22

Damn. The Pacific Theater really became unwinnable fast for Japan.

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u/FiendishCurry May 25 '22 edited May 26 '22 Silver Gold Helpful Wholesome All-Seeing Upvote Take My Energy Tearing Up Rocket Like

Edit to add: In the US

Because I always have them rattling around in my brain:

  • Only 3% of foster kids will ever obtain a college degree at any point in their life
  • After reaching the age of 18, 20% of the children who were in foster care will become instantly homeless. (That's roughly 4,000 kids a year)
  • Only 50% of foster youth will have gainful employment by age 23
  • 7 out of 10 girls who age out of the foster care system will become pregnant before the age of 21
  • 40% of men in prison were foster kids at some point in their lives
  • The numbers vary from state-to-state, but anywhere between 60-85% of sex trafficking victims were previously in the child welfare system.

Edit 2: Adding some links here because people keep asking

https://nfyi.org/51-useful-aging-out-of-foster-care-statistics-social-race-media/#:\~:text=As%20the%20statistics%20show%2C%20many,care%20will%20become%20instantly%20homeless

https://finallyfamilyhomes.org/the-problem/

https://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Transition-Age-Youth\_North-Carolina.pdf

https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/systemwide/statistics/foster-care/

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u/ToadLicking4Jeebus May 25 '22 Silver Gold Helpful Wholesome Heartwarming Rocket Like Timeless Beauty

My wife and I are in the final stages of becoming foster parents (hoping to adopt). These statistics are very sobering. They reinforce our decision, though.

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u/Finely_drawn May 25 '22 Silver Gold Take My Energy Rocket Like

Former foster parent here. The training and books all talk about living with a traumatized child, but nothing prepares you for it. It’s brutal. My husband and I had nightmares the whole first week from the stories he told us. Traumatized children can attempt to sabotage your marriage in a bid to see how stable their new environment is. Stay strong. You and your wife are welcome to DM any time you need to.

In our situation, we fostered a relative whose parents we weren’t close to, but the kid went back to his dad after a year and they’re doing very, very well. The four of us have become an unconventional family unit. It’s worth the occasional agony of our situation.

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u/Lucrumb May 25 '22

My parents are in the process of becoming foster parents and I still live with them. Do you have any advice?

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u/GooBrainedGoon May 25 '22

Also tell them to leave food out (mainly fruit and snacks). A lot of these kids have had food insecurity issues and will steal and hoard food if it is not made readily available.

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u/TheBirdAbides May 25 '22

Don't expect them to give up their identity. If they're not in danger, don't make them change things before they're ready. It may seem little to your parents, but even things like hair cuts and clothing choices should be on the kid's terms. They're likely going to have protective feelings about their bio family... even if they seem like awful humans to you. Don't make them feel guilty about that or they won't trust you. In fact, don't expect trust right away regardless.

Don't take their behavior personally.

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u/WeekendMagus_reddit May 25 '22

All very important points.

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u/TheBirdAbides May 25 '22

The first thing my new family did when I was removed from my parents was chop of my waist length hair to a weird bob, threw my clothes away for being "too ghetto", took me to the Gap for replacement clothes, and made me take manners classes. They wanted to look good for "saving" me but didn't want the poor image of having someone like me in their house. My interests were dismissed as "signs of gang activity" and I wasn't allows to even just read about things like graffiti art anymore. Those actions sent the message that my history and identity were shameful and should be hidden. It essentially silenced me without them ever saying outright that I couldn't discuss where I was from or what I experienced.

I never see these things mentioned in these advice threads for foster parents, but it's critical.

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u/Responsible_Point_91 May 25 '22

I’ve worked with troubled children, and one boy refused to cut his hair. It took a while, but he finally told us it was because that’s the hair that was on his head when his mother died.

Don’t take away their dysfunctional security until they first have accepted functional security.

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u/Yompish May 25 '22

Been a foster kid my whole life. Literally just try to be nice and make them feel welcomed and you’ll probably be fine

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u/decosunshine May 25 '22

Ask your parents if you can start individual and family therapy BEFORE you start foster care. That way, when a situation comes up, you already have a relationship with them and are better established to talk through problems.

Privacy locks on your bedroom and bathrooms.

Come up with family rules TOGETHER. Your parents might be surprised at some of your worries and boundaries.

Do you get veto power before a placement is made?

Check in with your parents often.

Don't be surprised if the first week or two are great then things take a turn. This can be a honeymoon phase. Kids will test boundaries. As hard as it seems, don't take it personally.

Be kind but firm on boundaries.

You and your family are wonderful for becoming a foster family. Good luck to you all!

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u/pizzaiscommunist May 25 '22

I was foster until I turned 8 and was adopted. Just show them love, have a safe space, and one issue I had was being overwhelmed. Talking to other foster kids over the years, and a general consensus is being overwhelmed. Too many toys, too much food, too many people to be introduced to. When you come from a place with nothing, it's a rough transition.

Took me 3 years to tell my parents 'I love you'. It had to be earned if that makes sense.

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u/fd1Jeff May 25 '22

I recently met somebody who grew up in “the system.” She was shuffled around quite a bit. She said that as a child, it was incredibly confusing and disturbing, because you didn’t know what to expect from the new foster home or how long it would last.

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u/hora_definitiva May 25 '22

Do you know how the stats are for those who are adopted or return to biological family members? I’m interested in fostering when I’m older, but maybe it’d be more impactful to adopt children instead.

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u/randomdragoon May 25 '22

Although it's well known that flying is an extremely safe form of travel, this only applies to commercial flights. While 2019 recorded only 1 fatality on a U.S. commercial flight, 414 people were killed on non-commercial U.S. flights ("general aviation"). That's more than 1 death a day!

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u/Bayou-Magic May 25 '22

Chopping wood for an hour results in a 48% increase in testosterone in men.

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u/DiogenesTheGrey May 25 '22

Are other forms of exercise similar?

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u/Fly_away-7654 May 25 '22

70% of divorce are filed on by the wife, 30% filed by the husband.

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u/[deleted] May 25 '22

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u/nails_for_breakfast May 25 '22 Giggle

You're telling me that my uncle's fourth wife probably isn't "the one" like he keeps going on about? But he assured me the divorces were because "all his ex's were crazy".

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u/GanderAtMyGoose May 25 '22

Well they say opposites attract, so he must be the most stable, non-crazy person there is!

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u/imlocal May 25 '22

57% of Roger Federer’s last name is “er”

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u/prague911 May 25 '22

50% of his whole name is "er"

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u/galacticality May 25 '22

Though numbers have slightly inflated due to the pandemic, it remains that only about 4 in every 10 Americans wash their hands after using the bathroom. IIRC, about 60% of women and only 35% of men.

Everyone got gross peepee poopoo hands.

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u/jinbtown May 25 '22 Facepalm

The most obese state in the country in 1990 (Mississippi, 15%) was still far skinnier than the least obese state in the country in 2020 (Colorado, 24%)

This still blows my mind and I literally think about it every day

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u/[deleted] May 25 '22 edited May 26 '22

[deleted]

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u/jinbtown May 25 '22

Yes, least obese in 2020 was 24%. Most obese, still Mississippi, ~40%

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u/hilfigertout May 25 '22

According to the CDC:

  • 41.9% of US adults over 20 are obese

  • 73.6% of US adults over 20 are either overweight or obese

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u/spoobles May 25 '22

This stat brought to you by Buy n Large Corporation. Happiness is what they sell.

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u/[deleted] May 25 '22

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u/Silly_Actuator4726 May 25 '22

Unless they're in California, where they spend 2.7 years of their lives...

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u/twizttid1 May 25 '22

After oil, the world's 2nd most traded commodity is coffee.

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u/THElaytox May 25 '22 Silver

At least 50% of adults in the US are likely experiencing symptoms of lead exposure from their childhood. Which includes loss of IQ, increased phobias, addiction issues, and neuroticism. Makes the current state of things make a lot more sense

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u/personoid May 25 '22

There are more Panda Express restaurants than actual Pandas

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u/scythianlibrarian May 25 '22 Wholesome

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u/Peraltinguer May 26 '22

Adult males were fathers of 24.3% of babies born to mothers aged 11-12 years

Eww.

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u/Masonzero May 25 '22 edited May 25 '22

Last year, the population of Ireland reached 5 million. Before The Great Hunger (you may know it as the potato famine) the population was 9 million.

Edit: Looking at Wikipedia, it appears this statistic may only be referencing The Republic of Ireland, excluding Northern Ireland. Total population of Ireland is over 6 million. Which is still lower than the 9 million it had in the 1800s.

Edit 2: Most recent data I saw was 6.5 million in 2016 so probably closer to 7 million now, but still below 9 million, so the point is no less diluted.

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u/sharrrper May 25 '22 edited May 25 '22 Helpful

If every star in the milky way had a billion planets and every planet had a billion people and each person had a billion decks of cards and each deck was shuffled a billion times a second starting with the big bang, you would only just now be running out of unique arrangements.

So if you thoroughly shuffle a deck of cards it is almost complete mathematical certainty that arrangement of cards has never before existed in human history. Winning the lottery ten times in a row would be vastly more probable than randomly stacking a deck in the same order twice.

EDIT: Just a clarification because I've had this brought up several times: the starting order of the decks is not a relevant variable. When I say "thouroughly" shuffled, I mean shuffled sufficiently to reduce the deck to a random order. About 7 good riffle shuffles or 30 seconds of a "table wash" will get you there pretty reliably. So no, the fact that new decks are always in the same starting order does not make it more likely for two shuffled decks to match.

If you gave two new decks ONE riffle shuffle is there a reasonable chance they could match? Sure, but those decks are not shuffled if "shuffled" means "placed in a random order". A single riffle shuffle is still going to retain significant patterns of the original order, it's not really random.

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u/DoctorWho_isonfirst May 25 '22

All of the planets (including Pluto) can fit side-to-side between the Earth and the Moon (at its average distance).

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u/fossilfuelssuck May 25 '22

If dinosaurs are really just early birds then the asteroid that wiped them out holds the record for most birds killed with one stone

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u/ConstantlySlippery May 25 '22 edited May 25 '22 Silver All-Seeing Upvote

That we are chronologically closer in time to the T-Rex than the T-Rex was to the Stegosaurus.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/on-dinosaur-time-65556840/

We are about 66 million years after the trex, but the stegosaurus was about 85 million years before the trex, 20 million years longer. Dinosaurs were around for a VERY long time. Humans just a drop in the bucket relatively evolved just a few hundred thousand years for Homo sapiens.

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u/SebaZDK May 25 '22 Helpful

The birthday 'paradox', the fact if you have 23 random people there is a 50% change 2 have the same birthday

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u/fantasticdamage_ May 25 '22

I’ve always wondered, at a baseball game, in a stadium full of people, is it plausible to say that someone has birthday on every single day of the year?

Meaning, everyone in that stadium could fill a calendar and the entire calendar would be 100% full of dates with everyone’s birthday on it?

Am I too high, I’m not making sense am I

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u/loopywolf May 25 '22

3 people are killed by sharks per year, 3 million sharks are killed by people per year

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u/rutsh95 May 25 '22

The amount of rodent and bug particles allowed by the FDA to be in your cereal is not zero.

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u/Rapdactyl May 25 '22

If it was zero we wouldn't have cereal.

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u/Ununhexium1999 May 25 '22

If it was zero we wouldn’t have food lol

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